Biofuels

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Will Growing Our Fuels Drive Us To A Cleaner Future?

Biofuels offer several advantages over fossil fuels. Most are less toxic. Crops used to produce them can be grown quickly, so unlike coal, oil and gas that take millions of years to form, they're considered renewable. They can also be grown almost anywhere, reducing the need for infrastructure like pipelines and oil tankers and, in many areas, conflicts around scarcity and political upheaval.

Global Warming: Can we Solve This and Move on?

I have "bristled" at the inappropriate use, on this issue, of "denier" language before, and so I won't belabour the point again. But I will say Sandford's use of the phrase "researchers are bound by the scientific method to invert the entire established knowledge infrastructure on this planet to see to if any given challenge deserves consideration" is obvious hyperbole.
Getty

Burning Garbage Is Like Burning Resources

Many urban areas have built or are considering building waste-incineration facilities to generate energy. At first glance, it seems like a win-win. You get rid of "garbage" and acquire a new energy source with fuel that's almost free. But it's a problematic solution, and a complicated issue.
Getty Images

How Germs Can Keep Your Motor Runing

The use of germs to produce biofuels has been in exploration since the mid-1990s, but finding the right organisms is a difficult task. The horse rumen has a vast array of environmental bacteria and ...something else. Could this be the treasure trove scientists are looking for?
Flickr: Bruce Guenter

Turning Human Waste Into Energy Savings

Sewage, biosolids, wastewater, effluent, human waste and night soil -- these are all euphemisms for poo. But instead of looking at it as something to be disposed of, why not use it to grow a crop that can heat our buildings, produce electricity or be used for compost? Camrose County in rural Alberta is doing just that.