BLACK

CP

Why Don Meredith Is Not an Embarrassment to the Black Community

Don Meredith's fall from grace is seen as a collective one, because there are a lot of black people who see his presence in the Senate as a collective achievement; he's seen as "one of us who made it to the top." We are so eager to see black faces in positions of power that we get caught up in the "excitement" of seeing someone who looks like us on the political stage, and we fail to pull back the curtain.
black father

Dads Who Dare To Do It Differently

Being a black father, I notice people being shocked that I am even involved with my children -- that's about living in a wider racist culture. Black masculinity has always been under attack. This Father's Day I want to encourage every black dad out there to remember you don't have to conform, you can do it differently, if you dare.
Zun Lee

We Need a New Model of Black Fatherhood

The legacy of the plantation will be seen today on social media with single mothers being told "Happy Father's Day." Such open congratulatory shout-outs are definitely a testament to the ability of those mothers. But it's also an open indictment of the broken models of fatherhood existing in their lives. It's sad really, but predictable because the model itself within the black community is in dire need of repair.
Thomas Barwick

This Is What It's Like to Be a Black Teacher in Ontario

A group called the Ontario Alliance of Black School Educators set out to complete the first ever comprehensive survey of black teachers in the province, specifically the racism they face. The survey was only able to reach 148 teachers, but the insight they were able to provide is shocking to those who have no idea what it's really like to be a black teacher.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Unwritten Rules of Professional Locker Rooms

In my opinion, bombastic statements are generally a defence mechanism by those who feel put upon by their community. However, as minorities we rarely control society's prevailing narrative. Therefor our comments are often misinterpreted. Professional sports is big business and players who attract controversy tend to scare away sponsors.
AP

Black History Month Deepens Racism's Roots

Now that Black History Month is over (didn't take long) I feel more comfortable in saying that I very much dislike it. Black people are more than a month, and are more than several prominent black figures. Black history should be a regular part of educational curriculum and media programming, yet it is differentiated and set aside, just as black people were not so long ago. How is this good?
Colin McConnell via Getty Images

Rob Ford Needs to Stop Using Black People as a Prop

Way back in May, I had commented about my unease with Ford's relationship with young black males. I said that his proximity to these kids as a football coach smelled of the Penn State scandal. Was Ford a teacher? No. Was Ford in anyway involved in the education system? No. Was Ford a crack user? Yes. Was Ford an alcoholic? A pathological liar? Yes and yes. I'm sorry, but there is no way I would have wanted my child, who as Ford said would either be "dead or in jail," groomed and mentored on how to become a man by a drunk crack addict who could pretty well end up dead or in jail when this fiasco comes to an end.
Getty

Trayvon Martin and the Red Herring of "Black on Black" Crime

Although I am convinced that the death of Trayvon Martin was not because of his race, and that the jury reached a correct verdict in declaring George Zimmerman "not guilty," I also feel the people raising the issue of "black on black" crime (and saying it is ignored in a way that white on black crime isn't) are being disingenuous. The fact is, "black on black" crime is no more common than "white on white" crime or "Chinese on Chinese" crime. Most murders are intraracial. If Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton annoy me with their contrived despair, so do conservatives like Newt Gingrich with their "What about black on black crime" line.