BLOOD DONATIONS

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Why Saskatchewan Needs To Reject Paid Plasma Donations

A start-up company is looking to establish a new business model in Saskatchewan. In worsening economic times, that might seem like great news. But if their business model is one that takes advantage of people's poverty and may undermine voluntary blood donations, then the prospect is far less appealing. If Canada did need to collect more blood, opening for-profit clinics is not the way to do it.
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Commodifying Blood Donation Could Solve Canada's Shortfall

The Voluntary Blood Donations Act" prohibits paying and receiving payment for blood, either directly or indirectly. With this bill, the legislature has made the giving and receiving of blood a sacrament. The simplest solution to the blood and plasma shortage is to desacralize blood and plasma. Instead of bowing our heads to this idol, we should see it as the false idol it is, and get back to having a market in blood.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Canada, Stop Paying Cash For Blood Products

WHO research has found that unpaid volunteers provide the safest blood donations. Among donors, this group consistently has the lowest prevalence of blood borne infections. Secondly, reliance on unpaid donations also plays a critical role in maintaining the supply of blood products. When a country permits paid blood donations, the number of voluntary donors actually decreases.
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Should Gay Men Be Allowed to Donate Blood?

I would respect Canadian Blood Services more if it took a stronger position on gay blood donations. Either stick with the lifelong ban and admit that it's a super-cautious approach to try to mitigate against potential infections we don't yet understand, based on the deadly mistakes made in the past with HIV. Or focus on the bloodborne diseases we do know about, and adjust the ban accordingly to six-months or one-year, as would be consistent with the current science of detection. Either one of these approaches would be a more defensible posture than the arbitrary five-year ban Canadian Blood Services has chosen to champion.