Brain Cancer

Remembering Gord Downie's Great Cause Can Save A Life

Suzanne Wexler | Posted 08.19.2016 | Canada Living
Suzanne Wexler

Gord Downie has chosen an excellent -- and personal -- benefit for his final tour. Glioblastoma (GBM, or stage 4 brain tumour) is among the number one causes of death for 40 to 60 year old Canadians. It also affects children and adults of all ages, without any genetic predisposition.

Gord Downie's Courage Powers Tragically Hip Tour

Adrian Brijbassi | Posted 07.29.2016 | Canada Music
Adrian Brijbassi

As Gord Downie closed the show with kisses to the cheeks of his bandmates and nods of gratitude to the 20,000 fans in Vancouver, the courage the lead singer displayed overwhelmed me. It saddened me, too. Downie, my cultural hero, is battling the same awful disease -- glioblastoma multiforme -- that took the life of my wife, Julia Pelish-Brijbassi, 137 days ago.

Doing This To Your Brain Can Boost Immunity

AFP/Relaxnews | Posted 07.06.2016 | Canada Living

A very exciting development!

Gord Downie's Doctor Talks Life, Hope And High Fives

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre | Posted 06.02.2016 | Canada Living
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

We know that time may be limited but that's no reason to stop living. So we celebrate that. Every good scan we have a little party or a high-five or a hug. Hugs are common in our clinic. There's much more happiness than people would expect.

Jimmy Carter Says His Brain Cancer Is Gone

CP | The Associated Press | Posted 12.07.2015 | Canada

The former U.S. president said doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth.

Vancouver Art Show Celebrates Creative Minds of Brain Cancer Patients

Adrian Brijbassi | Posted 10.08.2016 | Canada Impact
Adrian Brijbassi

Every day, 27 Canadians are diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. On April 7 of this year, 26 of them were strangers to me. The one who wasn't, the one whose text message -- "please come home ...I have the bad brain cancer" -- is seared into my memory like the deepest of scars, the one whose eyes I've sought for strength, resolve, security and acceptance for two decades, is my wife.

I've Beaten the Odds and Survived Terminal Brain Cancer

Zbigniew Jack Wendolowski | Posted 06.30.2015 | Canada Living
Zbigniew Jack Wendolowski

This year, I decided to participate in my first Enbridge Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. I want to bring hope to those living with cancer and the people who surround them. I was given three to five years to live, and today I am living stronger, healthier and happier then ever, five years after my diagnosis.

When My Husband Was Diagnosed With Brain Cancer I Became a Caregiver

Heidi Wilk | Posted 02.04.2015 | Canada Living
Heidi Wilk

Six years ago, my husband Matthew was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiform, the most common and deadliest of brain cancers. As Matthew's primary caregiver, I've come to recognize that coping in the face of a terminal illness is a learned skill, and sometimes it takes a lot of trial and error to figure out what works.

This Is NOT Good News About Cellphone Use And Cancer

The Huffington Post Canada | Rebecca Zamon | Posted 11.12.2014 | Canada Living

A new study out of Sweden indicates that talking on cellphones and even cordless phones can be related to a certain form of brain cancer. The study...

When it Comes to Brain Tumours, There Is Strength in Numbers

Marianne Lee | Posted 07.08.2014 | Canada Impact
Marianne Lee

When it comes to fighting brain tumours, having a strong and supportive team is the greatest weapon. I've been a social worker on the neurosurgery floor of a hospital for over 26 years. As one of the first people to have contact with a newly diagnosed brain tumour patient, I can attest that a strong network, a resilient team, is one of the greatest assets a patient, and their families, can equip themselves with as they begin this new chapter of their lives.

Dealing With My Mother-in-Law's Brain Tumour

Charity Gaspar | Posted 12.29.2012 | Canada Living
Charity Gaspar

A brain tumour is a scary thing. You can't see it growing, you can't feel it growing. It hides behind your eyes and watches you live your life... waiting until someone notices something a little "off" about you. My mother-in-law had a malignant brain tumour. Everyone's experience with one is different. This is hers.

Toronto Father Seeks Access To Experimental Cancer Drug

CBC | Posted 07.30.2012 | Canada Living

A Toronto father of three is pleading with a drug company to give him an experimental drug to treat the cancer that has returned to his brain. ...