Broadcasting

Global TV

Global TV Owner Deeper In The Red

TORONTO — Corus Entertainment Inc. lost nearly $16 million in its fiscal third quarter, the first reporting period since the TV, radio and animation company acquired Shaw Media for $2.65 billion in ca...
CP

Problem Facing Canadian Media Goes Beyond Loss Of Canada AM

Bell Media's brusque announcement that it is killing Canada AM represents more than the loss of a morning news and current affairs program with a 40-year legacy. It is further evidence that private television, now in the hands of a clutch of corporate behemoths, is no longer in the business of serving the public interest.
CP

The Liberals Must Act To Save Canada's Struggling Newsrooms

At a time when our consumption of the news is at an all-time high, the very institutions at the heart of our news media are in crisis -- and demanding the attention of our political leaders. Postmedia combined newsrooms in Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver in a move that not only saw many talented and dedicated journalists pushed out the door, but also saw distinctive voices quieted.
CBC

The CBC Should Not Allow Rex Murphy's Two Personalities

In management's view, Rex (one and two) is in such complete control of his perceptions and biases that he can switch from one personality to the other while walking from a radio studio on the third floor of the Broadcast Centre in Toronto to a TV studio on the fifth or to his kitchen to write a column for the National Post. That is obviously impossible, although convenient wishful thinking for CBC executives stuck in a pickle of their own making.
CP

The Public Has a Right to Expect Integrity From Journalists

Integrity in this context means that what you see is what you get. In the immediate aftermath of Evan Solomon's dismissal by CBC, lots of people wanted to know why him, and not Amanda Lang or Peter Mansbridge? If there is an answer to this (and I'm not sure there is) then it lies in issues of transparency.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Raising the Broadcast White Flag: What Lies Behind Bell's Radical Plan to Raise TV Fees, Block Content, Violate Net Neutrality & Fight Netflix

Bell announced that it completed its $3.2 billion acquisition of CTV on April 1, 2011. Less than four years later, company executives say that their business is unsustainable and effectively admit that they cannot compete. In most sectors, that would be grounds for unhappy shareholders and corporate change. In the Bell world, it means intense lobbying for radical regulatory reform to raise television fees, block content, violate net neutrality, and fight Netflix.
Handout

Broadcasters Should Not Censor Political Ads

Political speech is seemingly under attack from the last place we might expect: Canadian media broadcasters, that say parties can't use broadcasters' content in ads. Protecting copyright is not an illegitimate purpose, but this approach is less than ideal for political advertisements. Political parties rely on election advertising to persuade the electorate to vote for them. This political expression is a significantly important aspect of public discourse and should be accorded the highest priority and protection.
PA

Hacking Skype For Better Audio

The truth is that for under $2,000 you can outfit your audio recording studio with a proper mixing board, pro digital recorder, dynamic microphone, pop filters, mic boom stands, studio quality headphones and more. Here are 6 ways to get the best sound possible out of Skype.
Shutterstock

"Drafted" Recap: Auditions for The Score's Next Sports Broadcaster

For the past two years I've been actively recapping Drafted, a reality show put on by The Score and Gillette to find Canada's next sports broadcaster. I usually hate reality shows but Drafted really resonants with me because (A) it's a show about people pursuing their lifelong dream of talking about sports for a living and (B) what's more fun than watching emotional breakdowns when they fail at it?
Radio-Canada.ca

The CRTC Picks What's on Your TV But You Pay for It

Tuesday marks the opening of another critical public hearing at the CRTC. It will be considering applications to expand the mandatory distribution of channels on the basic TV service. But, bottom line, if our own federal government refuses to kick in a few more million a year to show just how important Canadian culture is, then why should the rest of us?
Alamy

CRTC Message to Broadcasters: Regulatory Games Coming to an End

Last week, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission announced that it is terminating the Local Programming Improvement Fund (LPIF). The fund, which was established in 2008, funneled over $300 million to broadcasters to support the creation of local programming. The decision caught the industry by surprise with the CBC calling it "astonishing" and Bell Media saying it is a "major concern."
AP

Can TV Be an Active Medium?

Television has always been based on two pillars: Destination. From "Must See TV" to your favorite sitcoms on Thursday night, you could always tell what the conversation around the water co...