Business Ethics

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Entrepreneurs Have A Duty To Social Consciousness

But because entrepreneurship is now under the intense spotlight of society's gaze, this puts a certain duty on entrepreneurs and business leaders in general. More than ever, today's entrepreneurs have a duty to exercise social consciousness. As arbiters of innovation, entrepreneurs -- true entrepreneurs, and not the star-struck wannabes who lack the true entrepreneurial spirit -- are in a prime position to shape the course of culture and society.
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It's Time To Get Serious About Ad Blocking

The reason ad blocking has been met with so much fervor, is that it challenges the very basis upon which much of the internet is run and financed. The public accesses content for free, in exchange for seeing ads that produce income for the creators of such content. The ethical dilemma has been framed as the following: does the public have a right to both consume the content, and block ads?
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Surviving a Business Ethics Crisis

Many business crises -- whether it is the BP oil spill or the GM ignition switch -- escalate into ethics crises. What turns a business crisis into an ethics crisis is often an initial unwillingness to accept responsibility for the wrong actions. The public will judge this unwillingness to accept responsibility as a sign of poor ethics.
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Integrity Is Good for Business and Boards

Western industry will mistakenly argue that integrity laws will disadvantage them or cost their industry jobs, but the reality is the opposite. Tough integrity laws will prevent substandard competitors from offering bribes, will disincentivize recipients from receiving bribes, and will strengthen Western companies who compete on the basis of price, quality and service.
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It's Time for a Big Data Code of Ethics

At present, there is no one governing body that oversees data usage by marketers and media platforms. There are codes of ethics put out by the Canadian and American Marketing Associations, as well as individual ethical codes drafted by marketing research associations among others, but who is accountable to them?

A Conversation with Ethicist Mark Pastin

Mark Pastin is an award-winning ethics thought leader, ethics consultant, and keynote speaker. The CEO of the Council of Ethical Organizations, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting ethics in business and government, he is author of a new book, Make an Ethical Difference: Tools for Better Action.
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Watching the Watchdog: Why Journalists Do What We Do

We journalists have done a lousy job of explaining how we do our jobs, how we practice our craft, to the people we serve. I'm of the opinion that our low ranking in public opinion polls is because we don't even try to tell the people who we are, what we believe in, what we do and why we do it. So allow me to try.
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What Big Business Could Learn From Downton Abbey

The sense of duty, responsibility and stewardship in Downton Abbey are nothing less than old-fashioned words for the "modern" concept that a few corporations are once again embracing: Corporate Social Responsibility. But with one important difference: Robert Crowley, the Earl of Grantham, is an individual as opposed to a corporation. And, he takes this responsibility very seriously.
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The Case For Paid Interns

Unpaid internships are in the news again as a result of a groundbreaking study on precarious employment in Ontario. There are a number of factors that play into the decision to pay an intern (or not), of course. That said, greed is ultimately the common denominator that business leaders share when determining whether to create paid or unpaid internships.
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Why You Need Trust in the Boardroom

Trust at the board level is necessary at three intersection points: board and CEO, board member to board member, and CEO to C-suite. Why does trust matter? Think about the transactional costs of a low-trust relationship. In low trust relationships, suspicion abounds and parties feel compelled to paper every decision and every discussion. What can boards and executives do about this? Here is some advice.

How to Conduct a Proper Workplace Investigation

the new Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) "whistle-blowing" rule that permits employees now to go directly to the regulator with a complaint and completely bypass the company's internal processes. The practical effect of this new rule is to put the heat on many companies and corporate boards to reexamine their workplace investigations of potential wrongdoing -- and that is a welcome development. Where do investigations go wrong?

Four Ways Honest Leaders Accidentally Create Ethical Risks

The hard reality is that good people do bad things, and honest leaders let it happen. Honest leaders don't do it on purpose--they create ethics risks at their organizations by simply focusing on the wrong issues. So how did the good and honest leader unwittingly cause such behavior? Here are four ways it happens.
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When It Came to Penn State's Punishment, the NCAA Got it Just Right

In the wake of the Penn State child abuse scandal, many in the media were outraged by the NCAA's decision to instantly vacate the university's win record from 1998 through 2011. As two ethicists with a combined 40+ years working in the trenches with organizations and their cultures, we'd like to offer the opposite view: the NCAA got it exactly right. What's needed at Penn State is a complete blood transfusion of good culture for bad.
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4 Ways Boards of Directors Can Save Their CEOs

You can't let board members off the hook simply because they're not full-time employees of the company, or that on just one day per quarter they're presented with information on which they can't always get feedback. And that's why Richard Schulze has been forced to step down from Best Buy's board.