Canada Hiv

What Happens When You Ask a Thousand HIV-affected Children How They Feel?

John Miller | Posted 02.26.2014 | Canada Impact
John Miller

Both the adults and the kids cry often but data collectors must not confuse their role with the families' service providers. It must be noted that the study has gone through several layers of ethical review and nevertheless, the stories trouble those who hear them. In some cases, children feel safe enough to make horrific disclosures for the first time.

Inmates Need Better Access To HIV Treatment

CP | Camille Bains, The Canadian Press | Posted 02.15.2014 | Canada British Columbia

VANCOUVER - Needle exchange programs and increased access to HIV treatment are essential to curb infection rates among Canadian prisoners, says the le...

How Far is Canada From Being AIDS-Free?

Laurie Edmiston | Posted 02.08.2014 | Canada Impact
Laurie Edmiston

banner Adhering to medications has the potential to bring about very positive results in the overall population. The thinking is that if you increase the number of HIV-positive people on treatment, you lower the total amount of virus circulating in a community and, ultimately, reduce the number of new HIV infections.

Don't Racialize AIDS Discourse -- Our Needs Don't Define Who We Are

Vijaya Chikermane | Posted 02.04.2014 | Canada Impact
Vijaya Chikermane

banner Racialized women and children, especially from the Global South often become the face of health issues as their faces (literally) are plastered on the websites and brochures of global health organizations. Their images usually accompanied by indicators of poverty and rural geographies and are offered to an audience as the justification for much needed programs.

The Number One Killer of People With HIV

Meaghan Derynck | Posted 02.02.2014 | Canada Impact
Meaghan Derynck

banner As advocates, we often like to use analogies to explain the scourge of pandemics like HIV: It's a runaway train with no conductor, a loaded gun in the hands of a madman, a tide that needs to be turned. The problem with analogies though is that they have a way of detracting from the overarching, inevitable truth: People are dying. Real people. By the end of 2012, there were 35.3 million people across the world living with HIV. Even more jarring is the fact that one third of those people also have tuberculosis, and many of them will die before they even know that they have it.

The Risky Relationship Between HIV and Poverty

Carli Melo | Posted 02.01.2014 | Canada Impact
Carli Melo

banner HIV is a development issue not simply because of its detrimental impact on economic productivity and the health status of a community, but because low levels of socioeconomic development are actually creating a context in which HIV continues to be spread. When youth perceive their future prospects as exceedingly bleak, they are more inclined to partake in high-risk behaviour.

Major AIDS Conference To Be Held In Vancouver

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 09.02.2013 | Canada British Columbia

VANCOUVER - Vancouver has been selected to host a major international conference on HIV-AIDS.As many as 6,000 delegates and media are expected to atte...

1,000 Need HIV, Hepatitis Tests After Sterilization Problems

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 08.03.2013 | Canada Living

QUEBEC - About 1,000 patients will need to be screened for HIV and hepatitis after sterilization problems at Quebec City-area medical establishments.T...

Why "Not Enough Money" Is no Excuse for Africa's HIV/AIDS Treatment Gap

Nicci Stein | Posted 06.29.2013 | Canada Impact
Nicci Stein

Imagine how you feel now, knowing that without your medications your condition will get worse and you know you will die -- a death that is completely avoidable. Imagine feeling that the world, including your own country, doesn't care enough to keep you alive.

Ali's Had a Cough Since 2006

Dr. Raghu Venugopal | Posted 06.24.2013 | Canada Impact
Dr. Raghu Venugopal

Ali is 36 years old and has been coughing for a long time. He has been coughing since at least 2006. I was called because it was suspected that Ali had multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Médecins Sans Frontières is working with the Chadian Ministry of Health to aid patients like Ali.

Why Are Women Getting Worse HIV Treatment?

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 06.13.2013 | Canada British Columbia

VANCOUVER - British Columbian researchers have found that women with HIV-AIDS are more likely than men to receive sub-standard care and treatment, put...

Building Women' Rights around HIV/AIDS, Sex and Reproductive Health

Jennifer Kitts | Posted 05.06.2013 | Canada
Jennifer Kitts

Many of the social and economic barriers that stand in the way of effective HIV prevention, treatment, support and care for people living with HIV are the same barriers that impede access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health programs and services. In societies where cultural and gender norms tightly restrict the sexual and reproductive lives and choices of women and men, the risk for both unintended pregnancy and HIV infection is greatest.

The HIV Stigma on Aboriginal Reserves

Janet Madsen | Posted 03.09.2013 | Canada
Janet Madsen

I am part of the HIV support community at Positive Women's Network (PWN) in Vancouver, BC. Many of our members are of Aboriginal descent -- not a surprise, given that Aboriginal people are disproportionately affected by HIV. Stigma shadows discussions about sexual health, mental health and wellness, drug use, and definitely sex itself.

Does Gender Inequality Cause More Girls to Get HIV?

Lisa MacDonald | Posted 02.11.2013 | Canada
Lisa MacDonald

It is no coincidence that in countries and regions with high HIV/AIDS prevalence, women tend to have a lower position in society. But exactly what are the linkages between how women and girls are valued and their risk for HIV/AIDS? A significant factor is the ability to make choices. Women's lack of power relative to men gives them less bargaining power in negotiating the use of condoms to protect themselves. Poverty and lack of alternative options lead women to use survival strategies, including prostitution and exchange of sex for resources. To improve women's position in society and give them more control over their life choices, the perceived value of women and girls must change.

Happy World (Ignore Women and) AIDS Day!

Paula Donovan | Posted 01.31.2013 | Canada
Paula Donovan

Hats off to the spin doctors who managed to turn this year's World AIDS Day into a global celebration. A mere 34 million people are living with HIV! ...

Aboriginal HIV Infections A Growing Problem In Canada

CBC | Posted 01.31.2013 | Canada Impact

Aboriginal AIDS activists in Canada say they are trying to lower the high rate of HIV infections among First Nations, Métis and Inuit people. ...

Could We Have an AIDS-Free Generation?

Laurie Edmiston | Posted 01.28.2013 | Canada
Laurie Edmiston

Recent advances in our understanding of HIV transmission, treatment, prevention and testing are changing the landscape of our response to HIV and generating a significant amount of optimism. The buzz at the International AIDS Conference this past July in Washington D.C. was that we may now be able to achieve an "AIDS-free generation."

How B.C. Is Beating AIDS

CBC | Posted 01.27.2013 | Canada British Columbia

Offering free treatment for HIV may help reduce the rate of new diagnoses, say B.C. researchers who are calling for the strategy to be used across Can...

Has AIDS Work Lost Its Heart?

Michael Yoder | Posted 01.27.2013 | Canada
Michael Yoder

Since 1996 we have developed better HIV medications and we live longer, fuller and healthier lives. People who are newly diagnosed and the young might not remember the endless funerals and whisperings about who was sick, who had committed suicide, or who had partied to death to escape the inevitable wasting and loss of personal strength and dignity. It's certainly a good thing that we have better medications, but the AIDS industry has become so dichotomized and disjointed that it is not recognizable from those early "grass roots" days, where everyday people did what they could with little resources and a whole lot of heart. The grass roots of HIV have withered and died.

People Living With HIV Are More Than Their Disease

Scott N. Harrison | Posted 01.22.2013 | Canada
Scott N. Harrison

World AIDS Day is time for both activism and reflection. As nurses, we know the benefit that modern health care has provided to people living with HIV, but we must ensure as technology advances, that we don't lose sight that a person lives with the virus, not the other way around.

Is Canada Further Marginalizing Those With HIV?

Michelle Munro | Posted 01.20.2013 | Canada
Michelle Munro

Canada used to be a leader in supporting research to monitor HIV in key populations -- terrifically difficult because the activities that put them at risk are covert and illegal in many countries; surveillance can expose vulnerable populations to authorities and create risks for them. But Canada bowed out of supporting the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Project this year, just one more brick in a wall that is contributing to exclusion and marginalization of those most vulnerable to HIV infection. It's such a shame that our government has lost its vision of never leaving anyone behind.

Fix a Law for Life: Canada's "Medicines for All" Campaign

Richard Elliott | Posted 01.20.2013 | Canada Impact
Richard Elliott

In the lead up to World AIDS Day 2012 on December 1, Canada's Parliament has the chance to repair Canada's Access to Medicines Regime (CAMR) and finally get the job done. Members of Parliament must make the all-important decision to end partisan political squabbling and vote "yes" for Bill C-398, the bill that will fix CAMR once and for all. Millions of lives hang in the balance.

ReIGNITE Documentary Hopes To Tell Story of HIV/AIDS In Canada

CP | Sheryl Ubelacker | Posted 01.13.2013 | Canada Impact

TORONTO - When award-winning Canadian filmmaker Paul Saltzman was first asked to produce a feature documentary on HIV-AIDS in Canada, he was intrigued...

Media Bites: Can Columnists Agree on HIV?

J.J. McCullough | Posted 12.07.2012 | Canada
J.J. McCullough

2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg You know what's not fun? AIDS. And you know what's even less fun than AIDS? People who have it, then have sex with you without telling. And you know what's the least fun of all? A bunch of stern newspaper editorials about the Supreme Court's recent decision that not disclosing that you suffer from AIDS before having sex can be legally permissible under certain circumstances.

Landmark HIV Ruling

CP | Mike Blanchfield, The Canadian Press | Posted 12.04.2012 | Canada Living

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has absolved HIV carriers of the legal obligation to inform sex partners about their condition as long as they ha...