Canada Infrastructure

Economic Development And Human Rights Shouldn't Be Mutually Exclusive

Udoka Okafor | Posted 08.01.2014 | Canada Impact
Udoka Okafor

What does it matter how many cars we eventually learn to start manufacturing, the roads we pave and buildings we erect, if those cars are used to transport homosexuals on our freshly built roads to the freshly built prisons.

Don't Be Fooled By Harper's "Surplus"

Ralph Goodale | Posted 09.11.2014 | Canada Politics
Ralph Goodale

Mr. Harper's only imperative is "looking good" for an election in 2015. To him, that means claiming a surplus, not matter how temporary or artificial. Never mind the nation's sputtering economy or tens of thousands of Canadians out of work.

Andrea Horwath Is the Election's Biggest Loser

Murtaza Haider | Posted 08.13.2014 | Canada Politics
Murtaza Haider

The biggest loser in this election is not the Hudak Conservatives, but the NDP. Had Ms. Horwath not defeated the May budget and triggered this election, she would have kept the minority Liberals hostage to her dictates. While the NDP is set to gain an additional seat in these elections, it has lost all legislative power it enjoyed only a few weeks ago. Hardly a success by any measure. Tim Hudak's Conservatives ran a far right Tea Partish campaign that took comfort and strength in ideology, flawed as it may be, and not in rationality.

Hudak Ignores Economics 101

Murtaza Haider | Posted 08.10.2014 | Canada Politics
Murtaza Haider

The Conservative platform is off the economic track as it invokes analogies and comparisons that defy the economic fundamentals. Ontarians on June 12 have to vote on their future. They can choose to invest in Ontario's education, health, and infrastructure. Alternatively, they can choose to become the victims of false analogies.

The Two Distinct Visions For Ontario's Economy

Murtaza Haider | Posted 07.09.2014 | Canada Politics
Murtaza Haider

As Ontario inches closer to elections in June, two distinct visions emerge for the provincial economy. The Liberals propose investments in physical and social infrastructure, which will require running a deficit in the short run. The Ontario Conservatives, however, balk at the idea of deficit financing and propose stringent spending cuts.

Want to Live Longer? Move to a City

Jon Packer | Posted 06.30.2014 | Canada Living
Jon Packer

As warmer spring weather finally arrives, many of us long for the great outdoors with walks, bike rides and the Holy Grail -- cottage getaways. The notion is that if we could only spend more time out of the city, we'd be both happier and healthier. The reality though is somewhat different.

Why Free Trade Agreements Grow Canadian Business

Terrance Oakey | Posted 05.28.2014 | Canada Business
Terrance Oakey

Policies that restrict competition ultimately act to the detriment of Canadian firms and their workers. Free trade agreements like CETA open new markets for Canadian companies, but also force them to compete against foreign entities at home. It is that competition that spurs innovation and productivity.

Why We Must Build Resilience Into Canadian Cities

Matthew Kellway | Posted 05.21.2014 | Canada Politics
Matthew Kellway

Tom Mulcair came to Toronto's City Hall last month and delivered this simple message: urban issues have to be a federal priority. And, he promised that the NDP would make them so. The occasion for Tom's visit was my urban summit, "Re-Imagining Our Cities II: The Resilient City."

Not Your Mother's Budget Surplus

Mark Milke | Posted 05.12.2014 | Canada Alberta
Mark Milke

Beyond higher taxes or more debt, there has always been another option: prudent spending. However, that is something the Alberta government has been less than adept at in some years. For instance, had the province increased program spending after 2005/06 and to 2012/2013 but only in line with inflation and population growth, it would have spent $22 billion less compared to what it actually sent out the door.

The Walter Scott Centre

Cole Hogan | Posted 04.26.2014 | Canada Alberta
Cole Hogan

Today I am announcing the launch of the Walter Scott Centre, a Saskatchewan focused think tank named after our first premier.

Make Infrastructure Dollars Go Further with Open Tendering

Terrance Oakey | Posted 04.15.2014 | Canada Politics
Terrance Oakey

The 2014 Federal Budget made important investments in Canada's infrastructure, something for which the Harper Government deserves great praise. However, the Government could get a lot more bang for its infrastructure buck if it required open tendering for all projects using federal money.

Why Colombia's is the Next Economy to Watch

Peter Hall | Posted 04.07.2014 | Canada
Peter Hall

Canadian investors are well-known in Colombia, particularly in the oil and gas sector. The crisis proved to be a setback to impressive investment activity, but it has since rebounded. Canadian direct investment in Colombia is now over 70 per cent higher than at the 2008 peak, at just under $1.8 billion.

How to Beat Stephen Harper's Cynical Election Playbook

Deborah Coyne | Posted 03.09.2014 | Canada
Deborah Coyne

We face two critical challenges in Canadian national politics today. First, how do we restore genuine democracy and persuade the 40 per cent of Canadians who sat out the vote in 2011 to vote again? The second challenge relates to the first: How do we convince those same Canadians to vote for the strong, active federal government we need to build a productive, innovative economy that fairly benefits all Canadians?

Federal Funding for Toronto's Subway Is Bad News for Canada

Christopher Smillie | Posted 11.24.2013 | Canada Politics
Christopher Smillie

The recent announcement by the federal government that it will fund Toronto's subway system is not good news for Canada. It means more of the same style of infrastructure funding we have always had. Instead of predictable, reliable and rules based projects, Canada is riddled with a mish mash of almost completed and almost dead projects politicians pick and choose to save (or not).

Smartphones? Pshhh. Get Ready For Smart Buildings

Jana Schilder | Posted 11.18.2013 | Canada
Jana Schilder

Embedded sensors are cheap and more importantly, they talk to each other and the grid. In an office building, for example, sensors can manage heat, air conditioning, office lights, building security, and video concierge service all from one location. The concept of "smart buildings" has been around for 10 years, but it has now arrived. It's real. With embedded sensors, software and a dashboard to control all connected elements, the building now becomes a "smart building." Did 25 per cent of employees forget to turn off their computers? No problem; Cisco systems can turn them all off remotely and save electricity.

Referendum on Regina Wastewater Plant an Opportunity to Clarify Facts About P3s

Charles Lammam | Posted 09.29.2013 | Canada
Charles Lammam

After months of heated debate about using a public-private partnership (P3) to upgrade Regina's wastewater treatment system, the city council recently...

Canadians Don't Trust Politicians - Let's Strive to Change That

Deborah Coyne | Posted 09.18.2013 | Canada Politics
Deborah Coyne

A recent Ekos Research poll finds that a mere 10 per cent of Canadians trusts politicians. This summer's tragedies are not political events. They do, however, demonstrate a critical reality: Political and governmental leaders must think and act for the good of Canadians in the long-term.

Why Everyone Wins With Public-Private Partnerships

Charles Lammam | Posted 07.31.2013 | Canada Business
Charles Lammam

As governments here in Canada wrestle with the challenge of providing high-quality transportation infrastructure, they should increasingly consider public-private partnerships, or P3s. The record shows P3s are more likely to be built on time and on budget, and they offer greater value for money than conventional infrastructure projects.

Great Public Transit Makes for a Great City

David Suzuki | Posted 08.05.2013 | Canada
David Suzuki

When it comes to urban sustainability, cities in the U.S. and Canada are employing innovative programs and policies to improve the health and well-being of residents and their local environments. But (with some notable exceptions, such as Vancouver and Calgary) no successful rapid transit infrastructure projects have been built in Canadian cities for decades.

We Want.. More Money

CBC | Posted 07.31.2013 | Canada British Columbia

Infrastructure funding will top the agenda when 1,800 mayors and councillors from across the country gather in Vancouver. The Federation o...

The Boomers Are Coming, Is Canada's Policy Ready?

Casey Vander Ploeg | Posted 04.09.2013 | Canada Politics
Casey Vander Ploeg

One of Canada's biggest public policy challenges is a coming wave of retiring baby boomers. This will increase the draw on Old Age Security, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Canada Pension Plan, and other social programs such as health care while the number of workers left to fund it all will shrink. To enhance economic performance and boost productivity, governments have reached into their policy playbooks.

The Next Thing to Worry About Post-Sandy? Infectious Disease

Jason Tetro | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Living
Jason Tetro

2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Natural disasters, like Hurricane Sandy, are common worldwide and leave the affected public vulnerable to the harsh realities of nature, including the onslaught of infectious diseases. The reality of any disaster of this magnitude is that public health measures are all but forgotten as people do everything they can to survive. The viruses will surely arrive before the area has recovered.

What Carney Meant to Say to Corporations: You're Fat And Lazy. Time to Exercise

Daniel D. Veniez | Posted 10.28.2012 | Canada Business
Daniel D. Veniez

Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney took a lot of flack last week for articulating a fact: companies have a lot of "dead money" on their balance sheets. But Carney was getting at a larger issue: Canadian companies take caution to an extreme and do not think and act more globally. Carney may have been too polite to say it, but many senior executives and boards in Canada are slow, bureaucratic, self-satisfied, defensive and extremely conservative. What Canada needs more of are corporate leaders who have the drive, the fire in their belly, and the thirst and sophistication to conquer the world.

Five Tips on How to Keep Employees Happy

Srinivas Kandula | Posted 07.25.2012 | Canada Business
Srinivas Kandula

Good news: job creation in Canada is increasing. Bad news: employees who were holding on during the recession might now start looking for better offers. So how do you keep employees engaged, motivated and productive? Here are five tips on how!

Vancouver Bureaucracy More Convoluted Than the Subway Map

Jordan Bateman | Posted 07.11.2012 | Canada
Jordan Bateman

What was once a simple sewer, water and garbage disposal utility has become a bureaucratic, democratically-unaccountable spending machine. It's time to move the Metro Vancouver Regional District back to basics.