Canada Pharmaceuticals

Now Is the Time for Canada to Catch Up on Drug Safety for Children

Terry P. Klassen | Posted 09.15.2015 | Canada Politics
Terry P. Klassen

What the report, Improving Medicines for Children in Canada confirmed was what pediatricians in the field already know -- that much of the medications given to children in Canada have never been adequately studied or even formally approved for the conditions they are commonly prescribed to treat.

Canada Takes Long to Approve New Drugs - and That's Good

Alan Cassels | Posted 07.23.2015 | Canada Politics
Alan Cassels

Provinces are clearly voting with their budgets, going slow and low on approvals and coverage of new therapies. Canada is not wrong to be prudent in taking our time to decide how, or if, a new drug needs to be covered -- a precautionary approach is just the smart way to go.

We Need to Curb Our Use of Antibiotics

Brian W. Rotenberg | Posted 07.19.2015 | Canada Living
Brian W. Rotenberg

The overwhelming majority of these incredibly common infections are caused by viruses -- that is, they will not respond to antibiotics -- so I don't routinely offer antibiotic treatments. When patients hear they won't be getting an antibiotic many become surprised and often upset. I then spend time counselling them about why antibiotics are, in most cases, the wrong treatment choice.

Clinical Trials Offer Hope for Canadians

Russell Williams | Posted 07.16.2015 | Canada Impact
Russell Williams

Improving the climate for clinical trials will also attract research investment which will in turn create jobs in healthcare and within the knowledge economy for Canadians. Clinical trials are the building blocks for innovation in healthcare and allow Canadians access to life changing innovations

National Pharmacare Isn't the Answer

Alan Cassels | Posted 07.07.2015 | Canada Politics
Alan Cassels

Bigger does not always equal better; sometimes bigger means dumber. Any national pharmacare program would need an absolute firewall to protect it from the inevitable politics of drug coverage, otherwise you'd be left with even more irrational and expensive drug coverage decisions.

Quebec-Style Pharmacare Program Won't Work for the Rest of Canada

Marc-Andre Gagnon | Posted 07.01.2015 | Canada Business
Marc-Andre Gagnon

Eight provincial health ministers organized a roundtable with healthcare professionals and academic experts on June 8 to discuss how we should transform drug coverage in Canada and several are now calling for a national pharmacare program. The question now is, what kind?

Universal Canadian Drug Coverage Is Good for Business

Steve Morgan | Posted 06.23.2015 | Canada Business
Steve Morgan

Businesses care about the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce. Employees that can afford the medicines as and when prescribed will be healthier, happier, and more productive. In this election year, it is time for Canada's business leaders to call for universal, public pharmacare.

There's No Good Reason Canada Shouldn't Have a National Drug Plan

Livio Di Matteo | Posted 06.14.2015 | Canada Politics
Livio Di Matteo

A new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal with health economist Steve Morgan as lead author argues a national universal care drug program would not result in substantial tax increases. It seems the time is ripe to finally complete our universal system of public healthcare coverage by adding a national public drug plan. If anything, these cautions should serve as guideposts to make sure a new national drug plan is not only effective but also designed in a fiscally sustainable manner.

Canada Needs More Transparency in Pharmaceutical Regulation

Kelvin K. Ogilvie | Posted 05.16.2015 | Canada Politics
Kelvin K. Ogilvie

The federal government plays a vital role in pharmaceutical drug regulation. We have many reasons to be proud of the systems for drug safety already in place in Canada. Yet there's room for significant improvement. Canadians deserve safe, effective, accessible and reliable pharmaceutical drugs when they need them. The only way to do this is through perpetually improved systems framed by transparency and openness.

It's Okay to Fail in Healthcare As Long As We Learn From Our Mistakes

Danielle Martin | Posted 05.05.2015 | Canada Living
Danielle Martin

In a public healthcare system, too often system failures end up as fodder for Question Period battles rather than impetus for learning. When investments have been made in new models of health service funding and delivery that don't work out, it can be difficult to proclaim failure as a means to move toward success.

Why Do Canadian Employers Waste $5 billion a Year on Inefficient Drug Coverage?

Alan Cassels | Posted 04.08.2015 | Canada Politics
Alan Cassels

Employers want their drug plans to be as competitive as those offered by other employers. So what happens when the norm is to cover all new drugs at any cost, even if the drugs do not provide additional therapeutic value? Well, the end result is that everyone buys "generous" plans instead of increasing employee compensation. Everyone we spoke with agrees about the need to educate employees and employers alike. And in fact, everyone agrees (even insurers) that exorbitant drug costs are a big issue for Canadians.

How Health Canada Failed to Uphold Its Own Pharmaceutical Ad Standards

Barbara Mintzes | Posted 03.28.2015 | Canada Politics
Barbara Mintzes

Although advertising of prescription medicines to the public is generally banned in Canada on public health grounds, shifts in administrative policy have allowed two types of ads since late 2000: "reminder" ads that mention a brand name, but make no health claims; and "help-seeking" ads that mention a condition, but do not state a brand or company name. We have identified six main weaknesses in how Health Canada regulates this advertising.

New Brunswick's Opportunity to Reduce Pharmaceutical Drug Prices

Steve Morgan | Posted 02.18.2015 | Canada Politics
Steve Morgan

The Liberal government of New Brunswick appears to be stepping back from the brink of mandatory prescription drug insurance. And so they should. The drug plan chosen by the Conservatives was designed on a false premise: that the private sector can better manage things than government can. In many sectors, that might be true. But not in health care.

Ontario Doesn't Need An Income-Based Drug Benefit Program for Seniors

Steve Morgan | Posted 08.10.2015 | Canada Politics
Steve Morgan

Rather than placing a tax on health needs -- as income-based drug plans do -- Ontario should consider a more positive road to universal pharmacare. Specifically, it should consider tax financing a universal drug benefit program that would give non-seniors the same coverage elderly residents enjoy today.

A Doctor's Take on Alternative Medicine

University of Toronto News | Posted 12.29.2014 | Canada Living
University of Toronto News

Dr. Mel Borins wants to you to be healthy and he wants you equipped with more than just your family doctor's orders. A family physician and associate professor of medicine at the University of Toronto, Borins is a leading expert in health and wellness who has advocated evidence-based, alternative medicine for decades.

The Plastic-Eating Mushroom Of The Amazon And Ecuador's Development Dilemma

Capt. Trevor Greene | Posted 11.29.2014 | Canada
Capt. Trevor Greene

We've all felt like a mushroom at one point; kept in the dark and fed on s--t. But the humble fungus has taken on a noble role in the fight against th...

How a National Drug Plan Can Boost the Canadian Economy

Marc-Andre Gagnon | Posted 11.07.2014 | Canada Politics
Marc-Andre Gagnon

A 2013 EKOS poll showed that 78 per cent of Canadians are in favour of establishing a universal pharmacare program in Canada. In spite of self-serving lobby groups who insist that the current system is working well and should not be reformed, establishing a national drug plan is the best thing to do for patients, for employers, for employees, for taxpayers, and for the Canadian economy.

Canada's Opioid Crisis Is Fuelled By Doctors

David Juurlink | Posted 11.07.2014 | Canada Politics
David Juurlink

he false notion that opioids are safe, effective treatments for chronic pain was inculcated by the companies that manufacture them, with self-styled "experts" preaching this gospel to front-line physicians. Incredibly, this happened in the absence of good evidence that the benefits of long-term opioid use outweigh the risks.

What Informed Shoppers Never Buy At The Drug Store

Posted 07.22.2014 | Canada Business

Shoppers choose pricier brand name drugs over their generic counterparts, but health care professionals know better, says a new study from U.S. and Du...

Stop Drugging Seniors to Save Money

Nicole F. Bernier | Posted 08.19.2014 | Canada Living
Nicole F. Bernier

Residents rely heavily on the nursing home to ensure their protection and well-being. So it is paradoxical -- some would say tragic -- that nursing home residents are too often put on drugs they don't need, which can be dangerous, and may even kill them.

The Future of Vaccines Will Be Personalized

Lawrence Solomon | Posted 08.17.2014 | Canada Living
Lawrence Solomon

Vaccines as we know them are on the way out. On the way in are personalized, precision vaccines, created through a new discipline called vaccinomics that promises to protect a higher proportion of the population at far lower cost and without the real and potential harms that mass vaccination programs inflict on some people. Vaccinomics -- vaccinology informed by genomics -- turns the traditional vaccine model on its head by making the individual the starting point, rather than the end point, in the vaccine creation process. Vaccines work -- or don't -- on the basis of cumulative interactions in our bodies driven by a host of immune response genes and other factors.

Canada's Drugs Need To Be Safer For Children

Martin Offringa | Posted 07.20.2014 | Canada Living
Martin Offringa

How do you strike a balance when treating children with drugs in the absence of such evidence? Most people might be surprised to learn that much of the medications given to children in Canada have never been adequately studied or even formally approved for the conditions they are commonly prescribed to treat.

Don't Blame Seniors For Canada's Rising Health Care Costs

Michel Grignon | Posted 06.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Michel Grignon

There is a worrying rise in health care spending in Canada, but it doesn't have much to do with population aging. It's not that we have too many seniors that will break the bank, but how those seniors, and others, are treated in the health system that affects the bottom line.

We Deserve to Know More About Prescription Drugs

Roojin Habibi | Posted 06.15.2014 | Canada Politics
Roojin Habibi

Why is Health Canada only letting doctors and the public know part of the story about the safety and effectiveness of new pharmaceutical drugs? Inadequate information can be as dangerous as misinformation. Here's how.

Has Your Child Seen This Propaganda Film in School?

Kenneth P. Green | Posted 10.16.2013 | Canada Living
Kenneth P. Green

Recently, a concerned parent pointed me to a film being shown to his child's sixth grade class, called The Story of Stuff. The movie, created in 2007, depicts a world in which big corporations, in cahoots with big government, pretty much destroy the entire planet and maliciously poison the environment for their own filthy ends. This is merely one example of how The Story of Stuff misleads.