Canada Surveillance

If You Could Speak at the Bill C-51 Hearing, What Would You Say?

Eva Prkachin | Posted 03.18.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Our own Steve Anderson has been invited to testify before the committee and share our community's concerns about C-51 with key decision makers. We know that when we speak out together with one voice we can change the government's mind. That's why we need your help right now.

Feds Address 4-Year-Old Promise For Better Spy Oversight

CP | Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press | Posted 02.25.2015 | Canada Politics

OTTAWA - The Conservative government says it is working on more comprehensive monitoring of Canadian intelligence agencies — over four years after c...

Better Late Than Never: Politicians Are Speaking up Against Bill C-51

Eva Prkachin | Posted 04.17.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Huge numbers of Canadians, including key Ottawa decision-makers, are pushing back hard against the government's Bill C-51, which proposes unprecedented new powers for Canada's security agencies. The bill effectively turns CSIS into a secret police force and would place every Canadian under a government microscope.

How to Tackle Canada's Privacy Deficit

David Christopher | Posted 04.07.2015 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Anyone can be a victim of surveillance. If you've used any of over a hundred popular file-hosting websites in the past three years, chances are you've had your online activity collected and analyzed by CSEC, acting without a warrant and with no independent oversight. There is a great deal that can be done to tackle our privacy deficit.

Harper's New 'Anti-Terrorism' Bill Will Create a Climate of Self-Censorship

Peter Nowak | Posted 04.06.2015 | Canada Politics
Peter Nowak

The Harper government's newly introduced "anti-terrorism" legislature, Bill C-51, has been roundly condemned as an assault on privacy and free speech -- and rightly so. Besides hunting down would-be terrorists, the new laws could be used to stifle dissent, remove due process and lead to the creation of a secret police force, critics say. In a supposedly enlightened and democratic country such as Canada, these would be unwelcome developments to say the least. But there is a deeper cost to eroding privacy than just the spurring of undesirable changes in external entities such as courts and communications networks. Also at stake is the very freedom of Canadians to internally determine who they are and want to be.

Snowden: Canadians Should Be 'Extraordinarily Cautious'

The Huffington Post Canada | Zi-Ann Lum | Posted 02.04.2015 | Canada Politics

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden addressed students at a Toronto private school via video link on Monday to warn about the perils of being complacent ...

Quebec Insurers Test Project To Track Drivers

CBC | Posted 04.05.2015 | Canada Business

The province's car insurance board says it will soon have another tool to make Quebec's roads safer. The SAAQ will launch a pilot project where it w...

We Need To Fight For a Free and Open Internet in 2015

David Christopher | Posted 03.08.2015 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Do we want an Internet that works for everyday citizens -- or one dominated by powerful bureaucracies, be they spy agencies, giant telecom conglomerates, or powerful Hollywood lobbyists? If we want a free and open Internet that works for all of us then we're going to have to fight for it.

Canadian Telcos Want to Build Surveillance-Ready Networks

Michael Geist | Posted 02.14.2015 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

Perhaps the most notable revelation from documents obtained under the Access to Information Act is that Internet providers have tried to convince the government that they will voluntarily build surveillance capabilities into their networks. A 2013 memorandum prepared for the public safety minister reveals that Canadian telecom companies advised the government that the leading telecom equipment manufacturers, including Cisco, Juniper, and Huawei, all offer products with interception capabilities at a small additional cost.

Disclosure Of Telecom Surveillance Info Worried Feds, Memo Reveals

CP | Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press | Posted 01.30.2015 | Canada Politics

OTTAWA - A move by telecommunications firms to be more forthcoming with the public about their role in police and spy surveillance could divulge "sens...

Now, More Than Ever, Canada Must Remain Free and Open

Josh Tabish | Posted 12.26.2014 | Canada Politics
Josh Tabish

It has never been clearer that Canada has a growing privacy deficit that needs to be addressed. Unless we work together, we could end up with a society that's more spied on and policed than ever before.

Government Spy Agencies Have Too Much Latitude

Amira Elghawaby | Posted 09.28.2014 | Canada Politics
Amira Elghawaby

Global attitudes on spying shift dramatically when the targets of the state's vast monitoring apparatus are suspected terrorists. Not surprisingly, a majority agree that it's acceptable to scrutinize the communications of those who would potentially do harm. Unfortunately, though, our governments have failed to show that they are capable of doing the job with care and precision.

Peter MacKay's Privacy Deficit Turned These Lives Upside Down

David Christopher | Posted 09.17.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Minister MacKay's lack of respect for Canadians is symptomatic of a government with a terrible track record on privacy issues. They continue to resist calls to take common sense steps to rein in Canada's out-of-control spy agency CSEC -- an agency that just 8 per cent of Canadians trust with their private information, according to a recent poll. The CSEC was caught red-handed collecting hugely sensitive information about law-abiding Canadian air travellers, and storing our private information in giant, insecure databases to be shared with their U.S. partners at the NSA.

The Conservative Government Just Doesn't Get It When It Comes To Privacy

Steve E. Anderson | Posted 09.07.2014 | Canada Politics
Steve E. Anderson

There are few rights more important in any healthy democracy than the right to privacy. When citizens believe they are being watched, their willingness to engage in democratic debate is eroded, which in turn undermines our whole democratic process. Yet we clearly have a privacy deficit in this country.

Shining a Light on Government Spy Requests

David Christopher | Posted 08.08.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Canadians have been speaking out in huge numbers about the government's mass surveillance of law-abiding citizens. For some time now, debate has focused on how many of our telecom companies appear to be cooperating with warrantless surveillance requests from government agencies.

The Best Ways to Better Protect Your Online Privacy

David Christopher | Posted 08.06.2014 | Canada Business
David Christopher

These tools can be up and running in just minutes. You'll make your everyday Internet activity much more secure -- while sending a powerful message to the spy agencies to boot.

Harper Is Willing and Able to Keep Canada Under Surveillance

Russ Blinch | Posted 07.27.2014 | Canada Politics
Russ Blinch

Yes, there have always been spies and espionage, all with the aim of stopping some calamity, the existential threats. But thanks to Snowden, the computer geek with the highest levels of clearance, we now know the U.S. has turned its giant spying apparatus on its own people. We also know, thanks to Snowden, that the Harper government is a willing participant and keen to add to our rapidly ballooning surveillance state. And future consequences may be dire.

The Pressure's On Harper to End Online Spying -- Let's Keep it Up

David Christopher | Posted 07.24.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

It looks like the rumble against the government's Online Spying Bill C-13 is turning into a roar. We hope that pressure from Canadians will encourage Conservative MPs to start speaking out about the hugely unpopular blanket spying measures in Bill C-13. They should put both public and private pressure on Defence Minister MacKay to split the bill and remove the online spying provisions. Tens of thousands of Canadians are now speaking out to demand an end to online spying, and new privacy rules to safeguard law-abiding Canadians from government surveillance. It's never been more important to keep up the pressure.

Big Brother Is Listening And It's Time To Get Mad

Michael Bolen | Posted 09.16.2014 | Canada Politics
Michael Bolen

What if Edward Snowden was Canadian? Would his sacrifice have been for naught? The government is spying on Canadians without warrants and nobody seems to care. As a child, I was taught that a democracy cannot invade the privacy of its citizens without consulting a court. As an adult, I fear we are no longer living in a democracy. But Canadians are not powerless. It's time to get angry.

Don't Care About Surveillance? You're Probably White and Middle Class

Angelina Chapin | Posted 07.20.2014 | Canada Politics
Angelina Chapin

Sociologists say that unless you're a tech aficionado, it's hard to care about government spying that doesn't affect your daily life. For most white, middle-class people, data gathering seems abstract. We can't see it happen and the only manifestation is a targeted ad on our Gmail that we might dismiss with a "well, that's creepy." For poor people, surveillance is an everyday reality.

Changes to Bill C-13 Could Have Saved Rehtaeh's Life

Glen Canning | Posted 07.13.2014 | Canada Politics
Glen Canning

This morning I spoke before The House of Commons' Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights and shared my thoughts on Bill C-13. I know there are concerns with C-13 and believe me, if there was something better on the table I'd be all over it. There isn't, not that I can see. Police have to have the ability to act fast when it comes to cyber-crime or their response is pointless. Our children's rights and privacy is already being violated -- violated by some of the sickest people you can imagine. If it's a choice between them and the police I'm siding with the police.

Which MPs Have Your Back When it Comes to Privacy?

David Christopher | Posted 07.04.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

On Monday afternoon, the government's reckless online spying Bill C-13 came a small step closer to becoming the law of the land. It didn't get through without a lively debate which saw many MPs speak out strongly about how Bill C-13 would enable a wide range of government authorities to spy on the private lives of Canadians.

Canada's New Privacy Legislation Fails

Steve E. Anderson | Posted 06.11.2014 | Canada Business
Steve E. Anderson

This week, Industry Minister James Moore quietly tabled a new Digital Privacy Act in the Senate. The proposed legislation should safeguard Canadians' privacy online but sadly does not. The proposal is likely to reinforce the feeling that the Conservatives are just bad on privacy issues.

NSA REFORM

CP | Eileen Sullivan, The Associated Press | Posted 05.25.2014 | Canada

WASHINGTON - The White House wants the National Security Agency to get out of the business of sweeping up and storing vast amounts of data on American...

3 Tools to Protect Your Data From Surveillance

Kris Constable | Posted 05.08.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Kris Constable

All the tools I recommend are open source, means you don't have to trust me, you can download the source code and look at it yourself before using it. They are absolutely required for protecting your personal, and business data from unauthorized eavesdropping, which happens by default for anything you do online.