Canadian Exports

Aquir via Getty Images

These Canadian Industries Are Winning the Trade Game

How is Canada faring in our industrial diversification? Progress on trade diversification over the past 15 years is likely one of the most remarkable developments in Canadian economic history. A strong dependence on traditional markets was only enhanced by the Canada-US FTA, which saw exports to the US soar to over 85 per cent of the total. But a big shift began in the New Millennium.

How Small Businesses Get Big International Results

Its small share of the overall marketplace might lead many to conclude that small exporters are too small to warrant attention. That would be a great mistake. The dynamism of this segment suggests that it is already a powerful new force in Canada's economy.

Are Exports Driving Our Economy?

OK, you're right -- this is really last week's news. But it is worth repeating. For a good many months now, economy watchers of many stripes have been looking to Canadian exporters to take the wheel a...
CP

Surprise - A Trade Deficit!

OTTAWA - Statistics Canada says merchandise exports declined 1.8 per cent in April, while imports increased 1.4 per cent, pushing the trade balance with the world to a deficit of $638 million from a s...
CP

Poloz: Canada Losing $40 Billion To U.S.

OTTAWA - Canada is missing out on about $40 billion in export sales and could continue to do so for years to come as uncompetitive producers continue to lose market share, Bank of Canada governor Step...

Canadian Trade: Pros and Cons for 2014

When international trade collapsed in 2009, the Canadian economy turned inward, and for a change, discovered a steady source of growth. That source is now tapped out, and economy-watchers have for some time turned their eyes back to trade. So far, the view has been uninspiring. Will Canadian trade carry growth forward, or is our hopeful gaze in for a big disappointment?
Holger Leue via Getty Images

Thinking Growth Markets? Think Mexico, Again.

One brief look at Mexico's GDP numbers for 2013, and you'd likely say, "What happened?" At the outset of the year, forecasts were calling for between 3-to-4 per cent growth. Instead, the final tally is looking more like 1.2 per cent. That's a pretty sizeable miss. If lots went wrong in the year, foreign investment in Mexico wasn't on that list; in fact, it had a banner year. What's behind this success?
Shutterstock

Canada-U.S.Trade War Thawing?

WASHINGTON - Signs of a thaw have emerged in a developing trade battle between Canada and the United States.The Canadian government has won a powerful friend in its fight against punishing U.S. meat-i...
Alamy

Business Investment: A Sleeping Giant Awakens?

Investment has been quiet -- almost asleep -- for an inordinate spell. Is it on the way back? A sleeping giant may be on the verge of awakening. When this one does rouse, it's likely to do so in a hurry. Those who are armed and ready to supply business quickly with the machinery and equipment it needs stand to win big in the next cycle.
Getty

What's Working in Canada's Economy and What Isn't

Canada's overall numbers are not as impressive, but they reflect the growth rotation that will see exports and business investment grab the baton from the consumer and housing sectors. Conditions already favour export growth: a weakening loonie, a surge in leading sectors, a key export market that is leading the way, and strong demand for resources.
AP

Is Canada's Growing Trade with this Booming Region a Good Thing?

In the 2000-2008 period, Canadian exports to ASEAN grew by 9 per cent annually, just under the average pace to emerging markets as a whole. Post-crisis, the rate of growth is exactly the same. Doubling trade in five years would require notching that pace up to 15 per cent annually -- not an unachievable target by any stretch of the imagination.
Getty Images

Are the BRICS' Economies Slowing Permanently?

How the mighty are falling. Resilience was a word used liberally to boast of the BRICS countries' staying power in the post-crisis period. Many even ascribed global-growth-engine status to these rising powerhouses. But 2013 has been a second tough year for the August group, even as OECD nations are steadily returning to growth.

Will the Summer Shine on or Sour the Economy?

There's a sour seasonality that has become entrenched in recent global economics. In the past few years, summer has become a disarmingly punctual momentum-killer of global production. Perhaps the most critical question in EDC's Summer 2013 Global Export Forecast is whether we are in for yet another summer drubbing, or whether this is the year we break with that sorry tradition.

Why Exporters Should Keep Their Chins Up

The world has become used to perpetual gloom, and those at the early end of their careers have known nothing but. Recent budding optimism stateside could be the very remedy for an increasingly tentative Canadian exporter. US sentiment is an indicator worth keeping a keen eye on.
CP

Canada Needs New Friends: CIBC

Companies need to take more risks in emerging markets so Canada doesn't experience another lost decade for exports, says CIBC's senior economist.Despite nine free trade agreements, the volume of Canad...

Wood Someone Check These Prices?

Commodity prices are all down, right? Wrong! Commodity prices have scored high on the economic shock-talk scale in the past decade. Although prices are generally still riding high, the recent trend ha...

Is the Loonie Really Losing it?

Stable is not a word that can be used to describe much in today's economy. A notable exception is the Canadian dollar. The loonie has soared in a reasonably tight range around parity with the U.S. dollar for 3 years now. Although exporters would prefer a lower level, the stability has made activity and cash flows somewhat more predictable. Now, the loonie is losing some loft; what's happening?
AP

Grab Your Goggles, We're Swimming in Oil

Surprise of the year: World oil production is rising more than was forecast. A shock? No, that's what happens when prices spike. What is surprising is that it's occurring right in our backyard -- in the good ol' USA. The bottom line? How quickly we have gone from running out of oil to being awash in the stuff. Maybe the surprise is that we are surprised that history is merely repeating itself!