Canadian Taxpayers Federation

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Take A Stick And Whack B.C. Carrot Rewards

What long-term health benefits would occur if government built $7.5 million in school playgrounds? Or spent $7.5 million cutting waitlists for surgery? Or made sure people had timely access to family physicians? Or improved rural or aboriginal drinking water quality to reduce the dozens of boil water advisories in effect across B.C. right now? Or any of a hundred other ideas.
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The Oil Industry Doesn't Want You to Have Better Transportation Options

American and Canadian transit opponents paint themselves as populist supporters of the common people, a tactic also used against carbon pricing. They fail to note that poor and middle class families will benefit most from public transit and other sustainable transportation options. To reduce pollution and address global warming, we must do everything we can, from conserving energy to shifting to cleaner energy sources. Improving transportation and transit infrastructure is one of the easiest ways to do so while providing more options for people to get around.
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B.C. Tax Rates A Win For Canuck Fans

This revenue -- which doesn't include corporate taxes, property taxes, sales tax or a myriad of other taxes B.C. residents are charged -- pays for things that benefit people far outside the Canuck dressing room. The Canuck players' income tax bill alone covers roughly the cost of 600 young teachers - or 425 Vancouver police officers.
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Why Is B.C. Liquor Still Overtaxed, Despite 'Reforms'?

Take a $15 bottle of wine, for example. In B.C., we pay $7.11 for the Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) markup tax, 60 cents in other LDB fees, and 94 cents in Provincial Sales Tax -- a total of $8.65 in taxes. That means when British Columbians buy a bottle of wine, they actually pay more in taxes and markup than for the actual drink itself.