Carbon Emissions

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Climate Change Is Nature's Tax On Everything

I'm outraged. Like you, my cost of living is going up. Home insurance premiums are up due to extreme weather. Food prices are up due to extreme drought. Taxes are up to pay for infrastructure that's been destroyed by ice storms and flooding. This climate thing is starting to cost -- a lot. Nature's response to our pollution is like a tax on everything. Since carbon pollution keeps getting worse, nature is digging even deeper into my pocket. So, what is government going to do to put an end to this cash grab?
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Paris Agreement Proves That Compromise Isn't A Dirty Word

I've always believed that if you shut people in a room for long enough, they'll find something to agree on. A fiery debate maybe more fun, particularly over a drink with friends, but if it never reaches resolution it never actually achieves anything. Agreements can come naturally, but more often they don't -- in which case they require capitulation or compromise. Given that no one likes capitulation (unless it's by the other person) compromise has to be the norm. So it was at the COP21 in Paris.
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Canada Should Be A Global Leader In Natural Habitat Conservation

Canada has a rare opportunity, indeed an obligation, to be a world leader in the conservation of natural habitat and by doing so to contribute directly to the fight against climate change. Conservation of our natural ecosystems is integral to any effective Canadian strategy to slow climate change and to mitigate its effects. Significant scientific evidence shows that the destruction and clearing of forests, grasslands and wetlands, in addition to the burning of fossil fuels, has resulted in a substantial increase in greenhouse gas concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere.
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The U.S. Can End Coal Power - Why Can't Canada?

The message to Canadians who care about health, the environment and the economy is clear: on October 19, voting is the most important thing you can do to protect the people and places you love. The sooner Canadians speak up in favour of a coal phase-out, the sooner we can rid ourselves of this deadly fuel for good. While the U.S. looks to coal for nearly two-fifths of its power, the figure in Canada is just 12.6 per cent. Some provinces, such as Alberta, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia, burn a lot of it, with serious environmental consequences, but as a country our reliance is fairly modest. In comparison with America's challenge, ours looks straightforward.
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The Other CO2 Problem Is in Our Oceans

When carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted into the atmosphere it doesn't just stay there -- about 25 per cent of emissions are absorbed into the ocean, increasing the acidity of the ocean. An ocean increasing in acidity is not a very friendly place for its creatures, many of which play critical roles in marine food webs and are vital sources of human food. I recently travelled to Italy and across North America investigating how ocean acidification could impact marine life. While I like to remain hopeful in most things, what I learned has made me very worried about the future of the ocean.