Caregiver

Having a Disability Doesn't Mean You Can't Have Adventures

Natalie Strouth | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

I've been reflecting on the fun experiences my family and friends had this summer. My thoughts inevitably also turn to those with new health challenges and disabilities, and their caregivers, the people who are supporting them. I've learned that there are many wonderful opportunities to get out and create lasting happy memories, participate in things that bring joy, and still manage the care.

Coping with a New Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis

Natalie Strouth | Posted 10.29.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

This week, Kerry asks: My sister was recently diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis and she is refusing to accept any help from her family, friends or health care professionals. When I try to talk to her about it, we always end up in an argument. Do you have any advice?

Ask Elizabeth: Taking Care of a Difficult Parent or Relative

Natalie Strouth | Posted 10.12.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Vicky asks: I've been taking care of my mom who is 74, in poor health and lives on her own. We've never had a very close relationship, and she criticizes everything I do. It doesn't matter if it's house cleaning, taking her to appointments, or getting her groceries -- it's like I can never do anything to her satisfaction.

Ask Elizabeth: I'm Worried About My Child's Surgery

Natalie Strouth | Posted 09.15.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

My four-year-old daughter is having surgery soon, and I'm a nervous wreck. Her doctors have assured me that she will be fine, but I'm worried about her getting put out, and especially worried about helping her recover at home after leaving the hospital...help!

Ask Elizabeth: Coping with Dementia and Personality Changes

Natalie Strouth | Posted 08.21.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Kay asks: My husband has dementia and the symptoms are getting so bad that I feel like a prisoner in my own home. I am embarrassed to take him to our daughter's house for fear of what he might do or say. I don't want our kids or grandkids to see him act this way. I am not prepared for these changes and I don't know if I can manage for much longer.

Ask Elizabeth: How Can I Support My Wife Who Has Cancer?

Natalie Strouth | Posted 08.05.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

My wife Karen was recently diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. We want to help but Karen gets frustrated when any of us try to do things for her, with the kids or around the house. I don't know how to be strong as the best husband, caregiver, and deal with my own fears about what's happening. Can anyone be a 'super caregiver'?

Ask Elizabeth: Should the Elderly Fear Falling?

Natalie Strouth | Posted 07.22.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Todd asks: My parents are getting older and recently, mom has become afraid of falling. She often talks about friends who have taken a spill, and whenever they come over she tells me we should have a railing for our front steps. She's even avoiding rooms where our kids' toys are on the floor. Neither one of them have had a fall -- how worried should we be about this?

Ask Elizabeth: Can People Live Safely at Home with Alzheimer's?

Natalie Strouth | Posted 07.15.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Rebecca asks: My grandmother is getting older and was recently diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer's Disease. She is still very healthy and independently living on her own. We have talked about her desire to remain at home and independent for as long as she can. How can we keep her safe in her home?

Ask Elizabeth: Caregiving as an Only Child

Natalie Strouth | Posted 07.02.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

My mom's health has been deteriorating greatly over the past year. As an only child, I am her primary caregiver and this last hospital stay has really taken a toll on me. She gets very limited formal help and the rest of her care is left to me. I am so tired and can't concentrate on anything any more.

Ask Elizabeth: How Do I Care for my Dad with Parkinson's?

Natalie Strouth | Posted 06.24.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

"How do I care for my dad as his physical health deteriorates? His Parkinson's is advancing and he needs more and more help. I feel unprepared and anxious, but I want to be able to care for him as long as possible."

Ask Elizabeth: Can Your Aging Parents Still Live Alone?

Natalie Strouth | Posted 06.17.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Ryan asks: At Easter this year I looked around my parent's house and realized that they are not going to be able to live here forever. When do you start talking to your parents about the future and where they going to live as they age?

Ask Elizabeth: Finding Mobility Aids for Stroke Survivors on a Budget

Natalie Strouth | Posted 06.02.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Coming home from the hospital following an illness or surgery can be overwhelming in an already stressful time and it's important to have a plan based...

Ask Elizabeth: Why You Should Step Up Foot Care with Diabetes

Natalie Strouth | Posted 04.29.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

Over three million Canadians have diabetes and this number is expected to reach 3.7 million by 2020. Caregivers of people with diabetes, especially seniors, need to learn all they can about stepping up foot care -- from maintenance, to shoe selection.

Ask Elizabeth: Talking About Signs of Dementia With Your Aging Parent

Natalie Strouth | Posted 04.23.2013 | Canada Living
Natalie Strouth

My dad is becoming increasingly forgetful and confused. He often calls me several times a day and forgets why he is calling. I tried talking to him about my concerns but he became quite agitated. I am really frustrated and don't know what to do?

How Caregiving Improves Your Health

Lily Sarafan | Posted 01.07.2013 | Canada Living
Lily Sarafan

It is a well-known fact that taking on the role of the primary caregiver for a loved one is often so stressful and draining that it can take a toll on your well-being increasing your risk for chronic stress and depression. But studies have found that caregivers do reap real physical and cognitive rewards.

Alzheimer's: Caregivers Must Also Care for Themselves

Joan Sutton | Posted 12.19.2012 | Canada Living
Joan Sutton

2012-09-11-Alzheimersbanner2.png Yes, when I write about how a caregiver should take care of him or herself, I am talking to myself as well as to others. I know how hard it is. For two years, I did not leave my husband. Like so many others, I postponed my own doctor's appointments telling myself I didn't have the time, and turning down invitations from friends. But firm words from two doctor friends helped me decide to take the occasional afternoon for myself.