Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

There's a Killer Flu Out There, and We're Not Prepared

Michael Ledeen | Posted 01.25.2014 | Canada Living
Michael Ledeen

Influenza can be a weapon of mass destruction. The latest candidate worth worrying about is H7N9. It jumped from birds to humans earlier this year. Of the 137 people known to have been infected, 45 died. There's no evidence that H7N9 spreads among humans. On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise any of the experts if H7N9 learns how to jump from person to person and mutates into a fast-moving mass murderer.

How Has She Survived Deadly Brain Amoeba?

CP | Jeannie Nuss, The Associated Press | Posted 10.13.2013 | Canada

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - A kind of meningitis caused by a brain-eating amoeba called Naegleria fowleri is incredibly rare, but it's almost always fatal.So ...

How These Tiny Pets Sickened Almost 400 People

CP | Lindsey Tanner, The Associated Press | Posted 05.10.2013 | Canada Living

CHICAGO - They live underwater, eat bloodworms, and are promoted on pet websites. But African dwarf frogs can carry salmonella.An outbreak tied to the...

U.S. Teens Choosing Pot Over Cigarettes: Study

CP | Mike Stobbe, The Associated Press | Posted 08.07.2012 | Canada Living

ATLANTA - A government survey shows more teens are now smoking pot than cigarettes.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday th...

Living Together Before Marriage No Longer Seen As Bad Omen

CP | Mike Stobbe, The Associated Press | Posted 05.22.2012 | Canada Living

ATLANTA - Nearly half of first marriages break up within 20 years, a new U.S. government study finds. With those odds, you might wonder: Would we be b...

Chickenpox Vaccine Dramatically Cuts Deaths In Children

CP | Posted 09.24.2011 | Canada

ATLANTA - Chickenpox vaccine has dramatically cut deaths from the disease, especially in children, says a new U.S. government study proclaiming an important public health victory.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that chickenpox deaths fell from an average of 105 per year to 14 after the vaccine had been available for a dozen years.