Canada China

The Probe of Three Gorges Officials Is Getting Too Close for Communist Party Leaders

Patricia Adams | Posted 04.18.2014 | Canada
Patricia Adams

Chinese President Xi Jinping's sweeping campaign to root out graft and curb abuse of power is now trained on the Three Gorges Corporation, the state-owned enterprise that built and operates the world's largest dam.

What Flight MH370 Has Done to Malaysia-China Relations

Munir Majid | Posted 04.03.2014 | Canada Business
Munir Majid

There have clearly been security lapses which need explanation -- as much to Malaysians as to anybody else. And at the outset, the crisis management could have been better coordinated. However, there is no indication there is something that could have been done to alter the realities of this tragedy. So why has Chinese diplomacy targeted the Malaysian authorities so harshly?

Ukraine Is Another Example of a Dangerous World of Clashing Hegemons

Errol P. Mendes | Posted 03.24.2014 | Canada
Errol P. Mendes

When the history of the early decades of the 21st Century is written, it may well be called the era of multiple clashing hegemons. The most recent glo...

China Must Regulate Pollution or Be Doomed to an "Airpocalypse"

Patricia Adams | Posted 03.10.2014 | Canada Politics
Patricia Adams

China's National People's Congress meet in Beijing Wednesday, with the country's crippling smog, which now looms as a threat to the leadership, high on the agenda. China's air isn't polluted because the technologies to keep it clean are unavailable but because the country lacks a credible regulatory regime that makes polluters pay and rewards investors to innovate. Why does the government target BBQs and individuals instead of the major polluters? Because it knows how to deprive ordinary citizens of their property and their lives. It doesn't know how to regulate an incoherent economy bereft of market discipline.

The World Is Getting Hungrier

Peter Hall | Posted 03.06.2014 | Canada Impact
Peter Hall

The world is getting hungrier. It has been said many times, but it bears repeating: the rise of emerging markets over the past three decades is now vaulting millions into the ranks of the middle class every year.

Cultural Insights on China and Japan That Everyone Can Use

Sara Graham | Posted 04.13.2014 | Canada Travel
Sara Graham

A personal introduction in advance will make your visit all the more enjoyable. Both Japanese and Chinese cultures view it as a sign of respect to extend themselves on behalf of a mutual friend, and you may find that they go to significant personal inconvenience and expense to make you feel welcome.

The Three Letters That Run Global Commerce

Neil Seeman | Posted 04.12.2014 | Canada
Neil Seeman

The DNS phone book helps humans navigate the underlying complexity of the Internet. Humans don't remember long numbers very well. They remember names much better. Hence the invention of DNS for University, government and then corporate email -− well before the proliferation of websites.

Typhoons Are Only Getting More Powerful as the Planet Warms

David Fogarty | Posted 03.19.2014 | Canada
David Fogarty

The intensity of tropical cyclones striking East Asia has sharply increased over the past 30 years and major cities and ports such as Shanghai in China could face a greater threat from more powerful storms in future, a study published on Thursday shows.

6 Reasons Canada Won't Share America's Economic Growth in 2014

Diane Francis | Posted 02.26.2014 | Canada Business
Diane Francis

Consumer debt is Canada is worrisomely high. The housing bubble in Ontario, condo craziness, has forced prices for all real estate upwards, and increased borrowing, with the result that Canadians now have switched places with the Americans as holders of the highest consumer debt.

U.S. and Canada Should Become Partners in the Arctic

Diane Francis | Posted 02.12.2014 | Canada Politics
Diane Francis

The fact is that Canada may announce claims, but it's too little too late and quite beside the point. Canada is not even in the Arctic game and cannot catch up unless it invests hundreds of billions of dollars or, alternatively, joins forces with the rich and powerful United States. Here's why.

What Killed China's Renewable Energy Industry?

Patricia Adams | Posted 02.11.2014 | Canada Business
Patricia Adams

China's aggressive push to "green" its economy and become the world leader in renewable energy is admired by many commentators in the West. Those admirers need to look again; after years of over-development in the face of decreasing demand, China's renewable energy market is on life support, barely kept alive by government subsidies.

My Life as a Secret Back Channel in Iran

Michael Ledeen | Posted 02.03.2014 | Canada
Michael Ledeen

I was a secret back channel to the Khomeini Regime in 1985. So when I read about the current crop of secret diplomats, and their dealings with (thus far unnamed) Iranians, I know what they went through. It's not always fun, rarely glamorous, and always dangerous.

Canada Needs to Think More Like a Company

Diane Francis | Posted 02.02.2014 | Canada Business
Diane Francis

Facts are that the new cold war is like the old one but is about conquering markets and resources. Canadians and Americans must join this economic weapon race and creating a trade sales force through embassies is a decent beginning. But much more needs to be done in concert with the Americans.

A Lesson From Hitler About the Iran Deal

Rabbi Ben Hecht | Posted 01.28.2014 | Canada Politics
Rabbi Ben Hecht

Whether we like it or not, we live in the shadow of Neville Chamberlain's Munich deal with Hitler. It must affect our perspective on any agreement of this nature. What we learned from Munich, though, was that deals do not finalize the results. What Hitler absolutely taught us was that what one says and even promises is not necessarily what one means.

There's a Killer Flu Out There, and We're Not Prepared

Michael Ledeen | Posted 01.25.2014 | Canada Living
Michael Ledeen

Influenza can be a weapon of mass destruction. The latest candidate worth worrying about is H7N9. It jumped from birds to humans earlier this year. Of the 137 people known to have been infected, 45 died. There's no evidence that H7N9 spreads among humans. On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise any of the experts if H7N9 learns how to jump from person to person and mutates into a fast-moving mass murderer.

The Week In Review: Before You Start Admiring China...

Marni Soupcoff | Posted 01.25.2014 | Canada
Marni Soupcoff

Anyone concerned with human rights would have to consider China's announced reforms good news (though I hope, for Justin Trudeau's sake, that they won't impede China's ability to go green fast and invest in solar). However, it's still wise to remember how far from a free country China remains. The government is still coercively dictating family size and reproductive choices -- and punishing those who don't comply. Reports of forced abortions and sterilization continue. And the government is amping up talk about the threats posed by social media, suggesting that further crackdowns and censorship of online speech could be in the works.

Why We Should Admire Justin Trudeau's Answer Instead of Mocking It

Blake Bromley | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Blake Bromley

My views of China are too conflicted for me to name it as the country I most admire. However, I remain grateful that Justin Trudeau had the intellectual courage to encourage Canadians to learn from China. If we want healthy political discourse in our country, we must listen and learn when politicians answer questions with responses that are honest rather than poll tested. If our politicians are not willing to study and learn from China, Canada is not benefiting from the political leadership we need.

Why Did Justin Trudeau Get Sun News So Hot and Bothered?

Philip Plante-Ajah | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Philip Plante-Ajah

For some reason, Sun News is really offended by what Justin Trudeau said about China, perhaps because Justin took a direct dig at Sun News, while answering a question at his Unplugged: Intimate and Interactive special last week in Toronto.

Is Canada's Growing Trade with this Booming Region a Good Thing?

Peter Hall | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada
Peter Hall

In the 2000-2008 period, Canadian exports to ASEAN grew by 9 per cent annually, just under the average pace to emerging markets as a whole. Post-crisis, the rate of growth is exactly the same. Doubling trade in five years would require notching that pace up to 15 per cent annually -- not an unachievable target by any stretch of the imagination.

My New Book: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country

Diane Francis | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics
Diane Francis

"Merger of the Century" is stirring a conversation in both Canada and the United States. And kneejerk reactions, by those who haven't read it, miss ...

What I Saw In China

CBC | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada Politics

On a recent trip to China, I heard the president of that nation make a startling announcement. China will rebuild the centuries' old trade rout...

A Reflection on China's Occupy Male Bathrooms Movement

G(irls)20 | Posted 11.25.2013 | Canada Impact
G(irls)20

2013-06-12-blog_girls_20_summit_v01A.pngAs a delegate of China for the G(irls)20 Summit, I wish to be part of the movement. I still remember sitting in a politics class on feminism, slightly amused when discussing China's "Occupy Male Bathrooms" movement.

Are the BRICS' Economies Slowing Permanently?

Peter Hall | Posted 11.18.2013 | Canada Business
Peter Hall

How the mighty are falling. Resilience was a word used liberally to boast of the BRICS countries' staying power in the post-crisis period. Many even ascribed global-growth-engine status to these rising powerhouses. But 2013 has been a second tough year for the August group, even as OECD nations are steadily returning to growth.

Tories Keep Meeting With Chinese Defence Chief Hush Hush

CP | Murray Brewster, The Canadian Press | Posted 10.30.2013 | Canada Politics

OTTAWA - China's defence minister made an unheralded stop in Canada last week, meeting with two Harper government ministers amid rising tensions over ...

Prison Abuse Steals the Show at Venice's Biennale

Diane Francis | Posted 10.19.2013 | Canada
Diane Francis

Ai Weiwei's most controversial piece, jail-like tombs, was housed in a cathedral that had been put in mothballs but was restored for his off-site exhibit. The six tombs are dioramas depicting his 81 days in jail in China -- sleeping, eating, going to the bathroom, being interrogated, showering and sitting -- in a tiny cell with two guards present at all times.