Canada Copyright

Canada Should Listen to Australia on Internet Censorship

David Christopher | Posted 03.10.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Now, our friends in Australia are sounding the alarm about how the Trans-Pacific Partnership could wreak havoc on Canada's economy. Australians know well the economic damage that unbalanced and extreme Internet censorship rules can cause.

Sunny Freeman

Secret Trade Deal Will 'Impact Rights And Civil Liberties'

HuffingtonPost.com | Sunny Freeman | Posted 11.13.2013 | Canada Business

A trade agreement Canada intends to sign will have “far-reaching implications for individual rights and civil liberties,” WikiLeaks says. The g...

The Closed-Door Media Talks That Could End the Open Internet

David Christopher | Posted 09.19.2013 | Canada Business
David Christopher

Big Media lobbyists and unelected bureaucrats are holding closed-door meetings in Malaysia this week, as they continue secret talks on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) -- a highly secretive and extreme trade deal that includes extreme new copyright rules that could end the open Internet as we know it.

Internet Freedom: How Canadians Are Kept in the Dark

Steve E. Anderson | Posted 08.27.2013 | Canada Politics
Steve E. Anderson

Here at OpenMedia.ca, we've already been hearing from Canadians outraged that our own Members of Parliament are still being denied access to the TPP text -- access that has now been granted to their counterparts in Washington D.C. We know that Canadians will not accept their Members of Parliament being kept in the dark

Canada's Copyright Board Is Badly Broken

Michael Geist | Posted 11.13.2013 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

The litany of complaints about the Copyright Board of Canada has mounted in recent years: The public rarely participates in its activities due to high costs, it moves painfully slowly, and its rules encourage copyright collectives and users to establish extreme positions that make market-driven settlements more difficult.

Universities, Copyright Collective Brace For Battle

CP | Diana Mehta, The Canadian Press | Posted 06.14.2013 | Canada Business

TORONTO - There's a battle brewing in the world of Canadian academia.On one side stands Access Copyright, a collective which has provided institutions...

Is This Canadian Newspaper Breaking Copyright Law?

Michael Geist | Posted 05.07.2013 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

If someone wants to post a quote from anything written by the National Post, they are now presented with pop-up box seeking a licence that starts at $150 for the Internet posting of 100 words with an extra fee of 50 cents for each additional word (the price is cut in half for non-profits). None of this requires a licence or payment. If there was a fair dealing analysis, there is no doubt that copying a hundred words out of an article would easily meet the fair dealing standard. In fact, the Supreme Court of Canada has indicated that copying full articles in some circumstances may be permitted.

Citizens of the Internet Aren't Going Down Without a Fight

Catherine Hart | Posted 02.12.2013 | Canada Politics
Catherine Hart

As the 15th round of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations draw to a close, the Internet freedom community is taking stock of what was said, and perhaps more significantly, what wasn't. Developments over the last few weeks suggest that the controversial treaty may be losing steam as public opposition gains momentum. The public outcry is starting to show the cracks in the push to criminalize our Internet use.

The Canada-EU Trade Agreement Leak

Michael Geist | Posted 01.27.2013 | Canada
Michael Geist

As International Trade Minister Ed Fast returns from negotiations in Europe that failed to secure a deal on the Canada-EU Trade Agreement, newly leaked documents to the CAQ and posted by LaPresse provide a detailed look at the remaining outstanding issues with details on the Canadian and European positions.

Canada - EU Trade Negotiations Clouded by ACTA Concerns

Michael Geist | Posted 12.17.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

The Canada - EU Trade Agreement negotiations continue this week in Brussels with both parties hoping to wrap up many outstanding issues. According to information provided by Canadian officials at a briefing earlier next month, the plan is to narrow the areas of disagreement to no more than ten issues, with ministers meeting in Europe in November to try to forge an agreement on the contentious areas.

Canada's Digitization Strategy Needs Dose of Fair Dealing

Michael Geist | Posted 12.11.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

On Wednesday, a U.S. court ruled resoundingly for the universities, concluding that the practices fall squarely within U.S. fair use (good analysis from Grimmelman, Madison, Smith and Krews). The case is an important win for fair use and it points to a potential model for Canadian universities that have lagged behind in ensuring digital access to materials.

Copyright Lobby Demands Rollback of Recent Canadian Reforms in Secretive Trade Deal

Michael Geist | Posted 11.25.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

More than ten years of contentious debate over Canadian copyright law appeared to come to a conclusion in late June when Bill C-11 passed its final legislative hurdle and received royal assent. Yet despite characterizing the bill as a "vital building block," the copyright lobby that pressured the government to impose restrictive rules on digital locks and tougher penalties for copyright infringement is already demanding further reforms that include rolling back many key aspects of the original bill.

What Copyright Rulings Means For You

CBC | Peter Nowak | Posted 09.11.2012 | Canada

The Supreme Court on Thursday issued a raft of landmark copyright decisions that will affect how Canadians listen to and buy music online. ...

The Supreme Court and Canadian Copyright Law

Michael Geist | Posted 09.11.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

The Supreme Court of Canada issued its much anticipated rulings in the five copyright cases (ESAC v. SOCAN, Rogers v. SOCAN, SOCAN v. Bell - song prev...

Are the Canadian Digital Lock Rules Unconstitutional?

Michael Geist | Posted 08.27.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

The House of Commons may have passed Bill C-11, but the constitutional concerns with the copyright bill and its digital lock rules will likely linger for years. Many experts believe that the government's decision to adopt one of the most restrictive digital lock approaches in the world. And guess what? It's vulnerable to constitutional challenge.

Paid Digital Downloads are Throwing Pirates Overboard

Michael Geist | Posted 08.07.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

Not only is the Canadian digital market far larger than virtually every European market, it continues to grow faster than the U.S. digital music market as well. In fact, the Canadian digital music market has grown faster than the U.S. market for the past six consecutive years. Yet, Canadian artist revenue from Canadian sales is lower than most other countries.

10,000 Consultations for Bill C-11? Tories Listened to Only One

Michael Geist | Posted 07.29.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

Last week's House of Commons copyright debate on Bill C-11 included a curious comment from Industry Minister Christian Paradis, who, in trying to demonstrate the amount of debate that went into the bill, said that more than 10,000 consultations had been held across Canada. This claim is not accurate in the slightest.

Why a SOPA Version of the Canadian Copyright Bill Could Target YouTube

Michael Geist | Posted 03.26.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

The Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright has already expressed concern with the Bill C-11 digital lock rules. Turning Bill C-11 into a Canadian SOPA would only make matters worse, creating a legal framework that would harm Canadian business and consumers.

What If SOPA Came to Canada?

Michael Geist | Posted 03.24.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

While SOPA may be dead (for now) in the U.S., lobby groups are likely to intensify their efforts to export SOPA-like rules to other countries. With Bill C-11 back on the legislative agenda at the end of the month, Canada will be a prime target for SOPA-style rules.

SOPA: A Warning to Canada Lawmakers

Michael Geist | Posted 03.21.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

As last night's Republican debate showed, even right-wingers are opposed to the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). All of this raises the question of whether the federal government's approach and the reactions to Bill C-11 will be consistent with the U.S. trend. The devil, however, is in the details.

Crystal-Ball Gazing: The Year Ahead in Tech Law and Policy

Michael Geist | Posted 02.21.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

Technology law and policy is notoriously unpredictable but 2012 promises to be a busy year. My weekly technology law column offers some guesses for the coming months. January: The Supreme Court of Canada holds a hearing on whether Internet service providers can be treated as broadcasters under the Broadcasting Act.

Stop Making Our Copyright and Digital Laws Worse

Romeo Saganash | Posted 02.11.2012 | Canada Politics
Romeo Saganash

Harper's bill C-11 is far more restrictive than it needs to be, more than the controversial copyright laws being fought in the U.S. courts, and more than international treaties regarding intellectual property require. Honest, hard-working educators, archivists, documentary filmmakers and consumers will be criminalized.

Challenging the New Digital Lock Talking Point: Why European Rules Are More Flexible Than C-11

Michael Geist | Posted 01.25.2012 | Canada Politics
Michael Geist

The Canadian digital lock rules are more restrictive than those required by international law, more restrictive than those found in many other countries, and so restrictive that they undermine the government's claims of striking a balance.

Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network Calls for Graduated Response

Michael Geist | Posted 01.22.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

While everyone is opposed to counterfeiting, the CACN is pushing for a massive public investment into private enforcement matters at the very time when the evidence suggests Canada already has strong legal rules against counterfeiting and a clear commitment from law enforcement to take appropriate action.

Universal Music Sues Insurer to Pay for its Copyright Infringement in Canadian Class Action Lawsuit

Michael Geist | Posted 01.15.2012 | Canada Business
Michael Geist

Earlier this year, the four primary members of the Canadian Recording Industry Association (now Music Canada) settled the largest copyright class action lawsuit in Canadian history by agreeing to pay over $50 million to compensate for infringing uses of sound recordings. The Canadian case has now settled, but Universal Music has filed its own lawsuit, this time against its insurer.