Corporate Responsibility

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Not For Sale: My Values

I was hot-stepping downtown the other day, headphones pumping, feeling good after a little gym workout. And this stopped me dead in my tracks. Colour faded from my face. Everything got a bit blurry....
Amazon

Lean In Until You Fall Over, Ladies -- You Still Won't Find Gender Balance

The Lean In zeitgeist says individual women can take personal responsibility for failure and act to achieve success. Meanwhile, recent research says there is an unconscious bias in corporate Canada that prevents equally qualified women from attaining the same level of success as men. The Lean In school is decidedly wrong. In short, both men and women need to lean in to create equity in business. It's the only way to achieve balance.
CP

The Lac-Mégantic Rail Disaster is a Corporate Crime

The Lac Megantic rail disaster is a terrible tragedy for the many who suffered loss. It is also an object lesson in why industries dominated by large corporations cannot be trusted to regulate themselves -- not even when there is nominal oversight by government. Corporations, when they grow large, go public, and take on professional management teams, devolve from being human institutions governed at least in part by genuine ethical constraints, into machine-like entities that are devoid of moral sensibility.
AP

Canada Must Improve Corporate Responsibility Overseas

The shock felt by Canadians following the recent tragedy in Bangladesh shows that we, as a country, care deeply about the welfare of others. In the wake of this tragedy, the NDP has called for stronger corporate accountability rules. Action to strengthen corporate accountability for Canadian companies operating and contracting work overseas is well overdue.
Carnival Films

What Big Business Could Learn From Downton Abbey

The sense of duty, responsibility and stewardship in Downton Abbey are nothing less than old-fashioned words for the "modern" concept that a few corporations are once again embracing: Corporate Social Responsibility. But with one important difference: Robert Crowley, the Earl of Grantham, is an individual as opposed to a corporation. And, he takes this responsibility very seriously.