Crimea

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When Putin Called Obama

Russian president Vladimir Putin telephoned his American counterpart Barack Obama almost a week ago to hint to him what to expect next, and to tell him to send his secretary of state to Geneva to meet the Russian foreign minister. The Washington and Moscow versions of the phone call were at odds with each other.
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Why I Won't Be Travelling To Russia

Perhaps if this had been a one-time occurrence it would be easier to digest, but the fact is Russian president Vladimir Putin has a shameful record when it comes to just about everything. He has never hesitated to put political rivals behind bars, even going as far as jailing the protest band Pussy Riot.
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Harper Meets With Ukrainian PM

KYIV, Ukraine - Stephen Harper paid a visit to Ukraine on Saturday, becoming the first G7 leader to witness the devastation in Kyiv as he took in the battle-scarred city square at the heart of the cou...
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After Crimea, the Only Question is "What's Next?"

The mood on Maidan Square in central Kyiv remains decidedly grim after a referendum widely branded as illegal and illegitimate took place in Crimea on Sunday. Two Ukrainian kozaks loudly beat drums in a rhythm that is normally used in the call to arms. It serves to heighten the sense of foreboding. Now that Crimea has been hived off from mainland Ukraine, "what next?" is the question on everyone's minds
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Why Geopolitics, Not Economics, Governs Russia's Crimea Decision

Despite the very tangible political or economic benefits it could bring, Russia never considered peacefully ceding any of its remaining territorial holdings to its neighbours. During the 1998 financial crisis for example, President Boris Yeltsin never thought of selling the sparsely populated, almost vestigial property of Sakhalin Island in the north Pacific to a cash-rich, land-poor Japan, even as Russia desperately needed hard currency to prop up a crashing ruble. If and when Crimea votes to leave Ukraine for Russia, Western economic sanctions will surely follow if Russia happily embraces the peninsula.
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Blame Western Hypocrisy for Crimea's Crisis

In other words, Russia's invasion of Crimea has been in the making for a long time. Russia's position of weakness as the Soviet Union disintegrated did not permit the Kremlin to act with strength against a policy of Western expansion at the expense of Russian interests. If anyone is the bully is this situation it is not simplistically Putin and the Russian military.
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DEFIANT

WASHINGTON - One by one, President Barack Obama's warnings to Russia are being brushed aside by President Vladimir Putin, who appears to only be speeding up efforts to formally stake his claim to Ukra...
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A Tale of Two Russia Today Anchors

On the evening of March 5, anchor Liz Wahl resigned from Russia Today-America at the end of her 5 p.m. broadcast. While it's not fair to speculate that Wahl made her dramatic exit in order to score a new, and potentially higher paying, job, it is certain that her patriotic exit will likely be rewarded by American media.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

The West Should Butt Out of Ukrainian Politics

The West, and especially the English-speaking West, has wrongly taken sides in the present conflict in Ukraine. Instead of making empty promises or threats, our message should be clear and decisive: "What is happening in Ukraine is a matter that its population has to sort out for itself. But, if asked, we will work with all interested parties to mediate a speedy and peaceful resolution." No more, no less.
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Why Putin's Attempts to Annex Crimea Would Never Fly in Canada

You can argue -- as I do -- that Canada's too immigrant-friendly and too multicultural, but the reality remains that ethnic diversity is now a basic Canadian fact of life. Upholding this nation's territorial and political integrity therefore requires a staunch commitment to the principle that national governments have a right to govern multicultural populations, and even stauncher opposition to any notion that foreign nation-states possess a right to infringe the sovereignty of others in order to protect "their" people living abroad. Canada is a country that worries about foreigners. But it's also a country that has a right to worry about itself.