Documentary Film

Eric Saczuk

Learning Respect In The Tahltan Lands of Northern B.C.

These mountains are the most heavily mineralized mountains I have ever seen. We were literally picking up big chunks of iron and copper oxide, boulders of obsidian and crystals. One hillside we huffed up was covered almost entirely in geodes, many of which were broken open and shimmering in the sunlight. The result of all of this was visually spectacular, with every colour you can imagine, deep hues of reds, yellows, oranges, greens, purples, blacks and whites all mixed together with pockets of northern boreal old growth and deep turquoise alpine lakes.
Huffington Post

Is the Homosexual Man's Obsession With Dolls Just a Myth?

Did you hear about the Drag Queen Ken-Barbie? It "came out" with three, count 'em, three of Barbie's dresses? Mike, a Barbie-loving, 30-something year-old man who never left home would know all about that. Barbie seems to have turned into something of a gay icon. The coming out process is two-fold: "They disclose their sexuality. They profess their love for Barbie."
AP

Documentary Has The Future Covered

Documentary was once seen as the castor oil of cinematic genres: it was supposed to be "good for you," but it didn't taste very good. Today documentary might be the coolest cultural form around, and new digital technologies are part of the reason documentaries are connecting with new audiences in innovative ways.
Publicity Still

VIFF 2013: Stemple Pass, The Unabomber and the Cabin Project: A James Benning Interview

American documentary filmmaker James Benning's new film about the Unabomber, Stemple Pass, is one of the few true must-sees in this year's VIFF, and plays tonight for the final time. There is more than a usual amount of urgency in recommending audiences get out to see the film while they can, since it is unlikely that it will screen theatrically elsewise: although Benning regularly has films in the VIFF, none, to my knowledge, have yet returned for an engagement in Vancouver. The film may also never see distribution on home video, which is possibly a good thing; the challenges and rewards of Benning's cinema are such that you pretty much have to see his films on the big screen, with an audience, where there is no option of pausing the film, no way to dodge the demands placed on you.
Getty

Can Documentary Films Be Catalysts For Change?

I'm often asked: Do you really believe in change? And while I acknowledge that it's hard to be hopeful sometimes, I do, undeniably, believe that a better world is always possible. This is where documentaries play a significant cultural sociopolitical role. They are the narratives of our times.