Economy

Why We Cannot Afford Gender Inequality

We simply can't afford that so many women in Germany leave the work force once they have children, not returning at all or more importantly not to their full potential. This is not just an issue regarding female rights or female empowerment. It's an economical need.
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Let The Market Determine Tuition Fees

Allowing universities to set their own rates will also send information into the marketplace. Prices are a source of information. They give a sense of the value and the reputation of specific products or services. They also provide information on the value of the brand. With such a system, universities in Quebec would do an even better job at creating an environment worth the investment in time and money.
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The Future Demands A More Diverse Workforce

Thanks to the unprecedented pace of change in the market, we are now at a moment where anything is possible. To seize this opportunity, it's important to recognize that the power base is shifting. The new technology buyers of today have extremely high expectations, and increasingly, only want to do business with companies that mirror their own diversity.
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Why Bill Gates Thinks We Should Tax Robots

As the founder of Microsoft, there are few people on the planet who have helped to guide technological progression (at least in the realm of computing) as much as Gates over the course of his 42-year career. The thrust of his argument is this: if robots replace human workers whose pay would otherwise be taxed, why then should the labour of the robots not also be subject to taxation?
Oxfam America

6 Myths About What Makes A Strong Economy

It is clear that people around the world are angry and disillusioned with the global economy. Growing inequality has left much of humanity struggling to make ends meet while the richest one per cent continues to profit. This rampant inequality is a sure sign our economic model is broken.
Canada, a G7 country, boasts one of the world's largest economies, ranking 11th in the world by GDP. The country's focus in recent years on resource extraction has had both its good points and bad; good, because high energy and commodity prices kept Canada's economy humming during the economic downturn of recent years; bad, because resource extraction brings with it environmental controversy, such as the one surrounding the Keystone XL Pipeline. How Canada resolves these tensions, and builds an economy for the 21st century, is among the central questions facing the country.