Economy

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

Liberals' 2016 Budget Opts For Big Spending Over Restraint

We've seen this story before in the mid-1990s, when out-of-control deficits and an impending sovereign debt crisis led to painful spending cuts and tax increases. The government is wrong to make the return to budget balance conditional on strong economic growth. Population aging is already taking its toll on long-term projections, and too many unforeseen events can derail the fiscal path. Only tight fiscal discipline can balance the budget within a reasonable timeframe, protecting Canadians' standards of living from future large tax increases and cuts to government services.
CP

The Federal Budget Must Stimulate The Economy

Ever since Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced Monday that the federal deficit would top $18.4 billion, all the familiar voices of right wing commentators, Bay Street analysts and Conservative politicians have made their all-too predictable calls for budget cuts and curtailed spending. They couldn't be more wrong. Now, in fact, is the time for some strategic spending to get the economy going, even if it means increasing the federal deficit when the budget is handed down on March 22.
KeithBishop

We Are Looking Forward, To Build A Better Public Service

This generation is among the most talented, educated and globally connected ever. While some of the experiences and expectations of these young people are unique to their cohort, they have much in common with Canadian workers of all ages and backgrounds: they are looking for a way to make a difference -- be it at the local, national, or global level. The federal public service must innovate to attract more young people. We need less rigid hierarchies, fewer layers of bureaucracy, more open and transparent decision making, a culture of intelligent risk taking, more opportunity for continuous learning, and greater mobility in and out of government.
Eric Sehr/Flickr

Adapting To Climate Change Means Investing In The Right Infrastructure

We know that climate change will continue to have major impacts on Canadian infrastructure, which is already aging and in need of re-investment. Moreover, we will soon see a wave of new, renewable energy infrastructure being put into place across the country, and it is essential that these innovative developments be implemented with resilience to climate change impacts in mind.
TransCanada

Energy East Has No Place In The 21st Century

Energy East wants to force the Canadian economy in this 19th century straight-jacket for the next 40 years. As a member of the G8, we need an economy based on know-how, renewable energies, manufacturing as well as refining our natural resources. Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre is right in rejecting TransCanada's antiquated project.
Canada, a G7 country, boasts one of the world's largest economies, ranking 11th in the world by GDP. The country's focus in recent years on resource extraction has had both its good points and bad; good, because high energy and commodity prices kept Canada's economy humming during the economic downturn of recent years; bad, because resource extraction brings with it environmental controversy, such as the one surrounding the Keystone XL Pipeline. How Canada resolves these tensions, and builds an economy for the 21st century, is among the central questions facing the country.