Electoral Reform

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Trudeau's Off To A Good Start, With A Long Way To Go

Justin Trudeau has enjoyed an extended honeymoon as a political celebrity on the world stage. He ran a campaign that promised so much and appealed to so many. Trudeau won our hearts and our votes, and after an extended period of Conservative rule, we were eager to see the new, fresh changes that his campaign promised. So after one year, it's time to sit down and ask ourselves: has Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered on his promises?
CP

We Are Coming To The Moment Of Truth On Electoral Reform

It's been one year since the election that our prime minister promised would be the last under the outdated first past the post system for electing Members of Parliament. The Special Parliamentary Committee on Electoral Reform has crisscrossed the country getting input from Canadians about what kind of electoral system they want -- and the message has been clear.
Sean Kilpatrick/CP

It's Time To Change How We Vote In Canada

We have had the same basic voting system in this country since Confederation. After 150 years, it is time for a change to something more modern, inclusive and democratic. It is time for an electoral system that ensures that everyone's voice is heard and counted when deciding the next government.
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Liberals' Electoral Reform Debate Denies Canadians Their Say

Simply put, the Liberals want a different result this time around. Ontario voted down a change to the electoral system (as did British Columbia and PEI), and the Liberals do not want to give Canadians the chance to say no again. Canadians deserve to hear from Mendelsohn and Butts in this debate. They need to explain why they are not adhering to the same open and fulsome process they created for Ontario. They need to explain why they gave Ontarians a vote in 2007, but are not giving Canadians a vote today.
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The Liberals Are Mistaken About Electoral Reform In Canada

After watching this issue unfold in Ottawa, I firmly believe that this exercise is motivated by calculated political advantage to the Liberals dressed up as democratic reform. I wish I didn't have to be so cynical in my assessment, but this exercise is premised upon fixing a problem that doesn't exist. Rather than improve our system, this exercise plays on inherent frustrations with politics and could ultimately be detrimental to our parliamentary democracy and even national unity.
CP

Electoral Reform: What Does History Tell Us?

Our current first-past-the-post (FPTP) electoral system has regularly awarded 100 per cent power to one of Canada's two established "centrist" political parties -- the Liberal Party or the Conservative Party(formerly, Progressive Conservative Party) -- even when their share of the popular vote has been well below 50 per cent of total votes cast, nationwide.
Canada uses a first-past-the-post electoral system, along with the United States and Britain, which critics say disproportionately favours certain parties. Justin Trudeau's Liberals campaigned on a pledge that the 2015 federal election would be the last under such a system. The Liberal government has convened an all-party parliamentary committee to review a wide variety of reforms, such as ranked ballots, proportional representation, mandatory voting, and online voting.