Emerging Markets

AP

Should Canadians Be Worried About the Weak Loonie?

A weaker Canadian dollar poses a threat to imported inputs to Canada's production machine, and to future Canadian investments abroad. But the soaring U.S. dollar isn't the only currency in play. Movements in other currencies are less dramatic. Perhaps this is an opportunity to scan the globe both for inputs to our production process and for direct investment undertakings in less-traditional markets.
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These Canadian Industries Are Winning the Trade Game

How is Canada faring in our industrial diversification? Progress on trade diversification over the past 15 years is likely one of the most remarkable developments in Canadian economic history. A strong dependence on traditional markets was only enhanced by the Canada-US FTA, which saw exports to the US soar to over 85 per cent of the total. But a big shift began in the New Millennium.
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A Step Towards Ending Global Forest Loss

The New York Declaration on Forests represents an unprecedented effort by developed and developing countries to partner around a shared goal of ending global forest loss and committing to a concrete timeline to realize their goal to accomplish this goal.

Currencies Are Another Casualty of Quantitative Easing's Final Act

Just over a year ago, markets went into a tailspin. At that time then-Fed Chairman Bernanke made what was supposed to be a benign announcement that gave new meaning to the word "taper." Currencies were thrust into the mayhem well ahead of the statement becoming action, as markets tried to anticipate the pricing effects of this new monetary regime. Tapering is now well underway; how are currencies weathering the storm?

This Economic Cycle's Oxymoron: More Growth, Less Cash

Cash has been plentiful in emerging markets. Between 2009-2012 as quantitative easing ramped up, there was a massive expansion in borrowing on global bond markets by emerging market (EM) sovereigns, banks and companies. As a result, EM economies are now closely integrated into global debt markets, and thus more affected by actions taken in Developed Markets (DMs), particularly the withdrawal of quantitative easing (QE).

Canadian Trade: Pros and Cons for 2014

When international trade collapsed in 2009, the Canadian economy turned inward, and for a change, discovered a steady source of growth. That source is now tapped out, and economy-watchers have for some time turned their eyes back to trade. So far, the view has been uninspiring. Will Canadian trade carry growth forward, or is our hopeful gaze in for a big disappointment?