FEDERATION OF CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES

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Cities Will Be On The Front Lines Of Implementing The Global Goals

According to the United Nations, managing the growth of urban areas is among the most urgent development challenges of the 21st century and will be a major factor in the achievement of the 2030 sustainable development agenda. By 2050, an estimated two-thirds of the world's population will live in urban areas, with 90 per cent of that growth occurring in developing countries. Local and regional governments will need to respond by developing and maintaining infrastructure to serve the population growth.
CP/GNM

These Are Issues Federal Party Leaders Should Be Debating

There was a very telling disconnect earlier this week between what passes for priorities inside the Ottawa bubble and the issues that really matter to Canadians. While federal leaders and backroom organizers debated the debates, Canadians were still stuck in traffic. They still worried about finding a home they could afford. They still faced the frustration of trying to be globally competitive with inadequate and aging infrastructure. These issues are critical to the quality of life of Canadians and they need to be front and centre in this election campaign.
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Natural Gas Trucking: A Made-in-B.C. Success Story

Economically and environmentally, natural gas makes sense as a fuel choice for transportation. A new waste or recycling collection truck powered by natural gas costs approximately 15 per cent more than a conventional diesel powered truck, but as natural gas has historically cost less than diesel, we expect a quick return on this investment.
CP

We Want.. More Money

Infrastructure funding will top the agenda when 1,800 mayors and councillors from across the country gather in Vancouver. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is holding its 76th annual co...
WikiMedia

Canadian, U.S. Cities Sound Similar Notes On Infrastructure Funding

The New American City being held this week in Kansas City, Mo. will draw business and local government leaders from more than 50 U.S. and Canadian cities. They'll be arguing the crumbling infrastructures whose refurbishment we may view at net drains on our wallets in fact hold value and the potential for economic boom if they are properly rebuilt and maintained.

A Penny Tax Can Be Transformative Investment

For every dollar Canadians pay in taxes, just eight cents ends up with municipalities, arguably the level of government delivering the services deemed most important to citizens. No wonder Canadian mayors are on a constant mad dash for more cash. It feels like they are on a treadmill, going nowhere very fast.
CP

Mulcair Warns Of 'Infrastructure Cliff'

Cities and towns in Canada are in danger of going over an "infrastructure cliff" unless a federally funded infrastructure plan replaces the Building Canada Plan, which is set to expire in less than tw...