Financial Crisis

Detroit: A City Revolution Built to Last

I was thrilled to participate in my first ever 'live' event as a Global Shaper of the World Economic Forum. But after hearing endless stories about the glamour of Davos, I certainly never expected that my involvement with the Shapers would bring me to Detroit.
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A Cause For Concern: BoC

OTTAWA - The Bank of Canada is again flagging Canada's overheated housing market and sky-high household debt as the biggest domestic threats to the economy, while at the same time judging overall risk...
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G20 Fails to Fix Global Finance. Again.

It's a wonder that the heads of state and heads of government of the G20 who just met in Russia spent any time at all talking economics. Seriously, how could they pull themselves away from discussing Syria (or Sochi, or Snowden) long enough to actually focus on the international financial system? Sure, that's the explicit purpose of the G20 meetings, but still, let's give credit where credit is due.

Corporate Directors: "You Hold Much of Our Future in Your Hands"

Boards should revitalize, as the American economy (and the world) is dependent on it. But they need to do so in a way that puts their own interests and reputations at risk. They need to be ruthless in recreating - and think only of the best interests of their enterprises. They need to "person proof" in other words, which is the theme of the NACD conference.

Incentive Pay That Works

It is hardly surprising that boards do not focus on value creation, strategic planning, or maximizing company performance, survey after survey, as much as they do on compliance. Their compensation structure does not incent them to. Here is what is needed to align director pay with shareholder interests:
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Canada's Dopey Reputation Needs to Change

The reaction of the populace to Calgary's flooding, particularly the city's ballsy mayor Naheed Nenshi, painted Canada as tough-as-nails action figures fighting World War H20. Despite this, the majority of non-Canadians still see us more as that somewhat dopey, big obliviously-smilin' guy portrayed on the cover of Bill Mann's book than they do us as the fearless, hip, smart folk we know we are. Which is why, if I could change anything about our country, it would be the symbols that define us to others.