First Past The Post

Sean Kilpatrick/CP

It's Time To Change How We Vote In Canada

We have had the same basic voting system in this country since Confederation. After 150 years, it is time for a change to something more modern, inclusive and democratic. It is time for an electoral system that ensures that everyone's voice is heard and counted when deciding the next government.
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Liberals' Electoral Reform Debate Denies Canadians Their Say

Simply put, the Liberals want a different result this time around. Ontario voted down a change to the electoral system (as did British Columbia and PEI), and the Liberals do not want to give Canadians the chance to say no again. Canadians deserve to hear from Mendelsohn and Butts in this debate. They need to explain why they are not adhering to the same open and fulsome process they created for Ontario. They need to explain why they gave Ontarians a vote in 2007, but are not giving Canadians a vote today.
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When a Majority Is Not a Majority

only 39 per cent of those who voted chose Liberal candidates. Four years ago the Conservatives took 39 per cent of the popular vote and were also a "majority." The "majority" before that was another Liberal one. The last time we had a real majority government in Canada was back in 1984 when the Mulroney Conservatives got 50.03 per cent of the popular vote.
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Exposing the Double-Standard of Ranked Ballot Critics

Ranked ballots give more power to voters by eliminating strategic voting, encouraging positive campaigns and ensuring that unpopular incumbents can't win their seats due to vote-splitting -- but critics of reform are speaking out. They reveal a comedic double-standard. Some of the same people who are trying to derail democratic reform in Ontario themselves use the exact same system that they claim is too complex or unfair.
AP

I Envy Egypt -- And You Should Too

Instead of denouncing the direct democratic actions of Egyptians, perhaps the pundits and Canadian leaders should be asking themselves: how can we re-enfranchise Canadians to participate as willingly and energetically in their country as Egyptians are in theirs? Canadians blog and tweet, but we do not cover Parliament Hill with protestors. Our lives are comfy in comparison to the Egyptians, so maybe that's why we do not protest. Yet there must be a sense of powerlessness, of hopelessness even among the comfy for fewer and fewer Canadians to be going to the polls.
CP

How Dirty Hands Win Campaigns

The political style of Harper and Christy Clark has been polarizing and driven by wedges designed to shore up their base. They haven't governed; their modus operandi is obfuscation and public relations. They lie as a matter of deliberate political strategy, but they come out winners. If Adrian Dix and Michael Ignatieff have taught us anything, it is that opposition leaders must not allow themselves to become human piñatas in the name of the "high road". They have a solemn duty to hold governments accountable for their records. That means fully engaging in the fight, not being passive in the face of it.
CP

NDP Liberal Merger or Proportional Representation?

Both the Liberals and NDP could benefit from a merger, but the NDP are hoping to take the Liberals' place as Canada's centre-left alternative while the Liberals are hoping for a comeback. What's problematic is that a merger would reduce our political choices. That's where electoral reform comes in.