Food And Drug Administration

Getty Images

One Death Isn't Reason Enough to Ban Energy Drinks

A Maryland couple is suing a beverages maker after their 14-year-old daughter died of a heart attack after consuming two 24-ounce Monster beverages over a 24-hour period. But there is little reason to believe that a regulatory crackdown on energy drinks would bring meaningful public health benefits. To put it crudely, one child dying from caffeine toxicity is not an epidemic. By contrast, roughly 700 children drown annually in the United States, mostly in swimming pools. But no one would want to live in a country where kids aren't allowed near swimming pools. The real take away from this story is that despite the fact that we live at the safest time in human history, risk cannot be eliminated entirely.
Alamy

Food Allergies? Shopping's About to Get a Lot Easier

Did you know there are at least 17 "other" names for eggs, 12 for milk and eight for peanuts that are commonly used in food labels? Effective August 4, all Canadian food labels have to clearly indicate if the product contains one of the most common food allergens or gluten. And even better -- the labels have to disclose common names of the allergen, like milk, eggs, soy, etc. Can you hear that? That's the collective sigh of relief from food allergy sufferers and people with gluten intolerances!