FUKUSHIMA

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The Shadow Of Chernobyl Looms Large 30 Years Later

Thirty years on from the world's worst nuclear accident, millions of people are still living with radioactive fallout from Chernobyl. In contaminated areas, radiation touches every aspect of people's lives: it's in the food they eat, the milk they drink, and in the schools, parks and playgrounds their children play in. The human toll of reactor accidents is why nuclear power may never gain widespread acceptance, no matter how much the industry tries to reassure us that risks are low.
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Citizen Scientists Are Digging in and Getting Results

Science, too, is now in the hands of citizens around the world. From the ocean depths to the outer reaches of distant galaxies, and from projects run out of home garages to research platforms with over a million volunteer contributors, science has never been more accessible to the average person.
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The Environment Needs Citizen Scientists

Smartphones, the Internet and accessible research technologies deinstitutionalize science and get the inner scientist in all of us outside to contribute to a broader understanding of a variety of topics, from backyard birds to flower-blooming times. Science relies on observation. As more people examine natural phenomena and record and share information, we gain better understanding of the world. An increasing number of scientific inquiries now depend on contributions from ordinary people to help them answer important questions.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Return To Fukushima

TOMIOKA, Japan - Whenever Kazuhiro Onuki goes home, to his real home that is, the 66-year-old former librarian dons protective gear from head to toe and hangs a dosimeter around his neck.Grass grows w...
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Suzuki 'Regrets' Dire Fukushima Warning

David Suzuki has admitted that his dire warning about the potential disaster another Fukushima earthquake might precipitate was an "off-the-cuff" response and something the B.C. environmentalist now r...