Gardening

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The Fences That Separate Us All

There is a story of two brothers who grew up to find a similar barrier between them. As young boys in their parents' home with a shaded courtyard where they played football and did their homework, there had been no India and no Pakistan. Now, all of a sudden, they found themselves as citizens of two different fledgling states.
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How To Keep Your Garden Canadian

Many of the plants we have in our yards are not native to Canada. In some cases, these non-native plants are invasive and can intrude into nearby natural areas or affect the growth and spread of native species. In most cases, native plants provide better habitat for birds and pollinators than non-native plants. Honey bees depend on native plants in order to produce honey and survive while doing their part to spread these native species.
World Vision

Planting Seeds Of Hope This Easter Weekend

It's not so easy in countries ravaged by the El Nino weather phenomenon. Most rural families work a garden or field to produce enough for the year ahead. When the rains don't come as usual, everything changes. Children must lug dead-weight water jugs over huge distances to keep their crops alive.
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How Much Food Can Cities Produce?

Urban agriculture won't resolve all food production and distribution problems, but it could help take pressure off rural land while providing other advantages. From balcony, backyard, rooftop, indoor and community gardens to city beehives and chicken coops to larger urban farms and farmers markets, growing and distributing local food in or near cities is a healthy way to help the environment.