Global Issues

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How To Build Resilient Cities In The Face Of Natural Disaster

Canadians can help make their communities resilient. Get together with your neighbours and make a community emergency plan. Identify the most vulnerable in your neighbourhood -- seniors living alone, large families with young children -- and create a volunteer network to check up on them when extreme weather strikes. If you own a business, consider how you could help out--for example, a restaurant might prepare meals for residents stranded in emergency shelters.
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Looking Beyond World Water Day

Tyler and Alex Mifflin spent summers in the water. Childhood memories of canoe trips and pristine waves contrast heavily with something they heard from adults time and again: "Don't swim in Lake Ontario. It's too polluted." That warning was the first drop in the bucket that's become a shared life goal. March 22 is World Water Day and we need the conversation to extend beyond the environment. So we spoke with the Mifflin brothers about the importance of water and how ordinary people can take action every day in unexpected ways.

The Power Of Letters In The Digital Age

Growing up, there was an unspoken absence in Zainib Abdullah's life. In Richmond Hill, Ontario, far from the home her family left in Iraq, she pieced together the story of her uncle. He had been unjustly arrested and disappeared years earlier by Saddam Hussein's government, without a trial or a chance to say goodbye to his loved ones. Now she puts pen to paper, writing letters on behalf of people unfairly imprisoned around the world.
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6 Eco-Friendly Inventions That Can Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

Our world doesn't look much like the ones envisioned in sci-fi flicks like Star Trek or Back to the Future, let alone the latest installment of Star Wars. Kids aren't buzzing around on flying skateboards, and we aren't dueling with light sabers. But who needs movies when real-world innovations are way cooler -- especially the ones poised to radically transform humanity's eco footprint.
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How One Canadian College Is Building Better Health In Tanzania

Over the past 15 years, Tanzania has made a concerted effort to immunize its children -- and has achieved a remarkable vaccination rate of almost 90 per cent. That's not good enough for the government and health organizations, though. They want to get as close to 100 per cent as possible. But figuring out which children have been missed is a huge challenge in a country where many families still live nomadic lives in remote areas. Enter Seattle health organization PATH and Canada's own Mohawk College, in Hamilton, Ont. They're helping out, not with more vaccines or nurses, but a database.
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Social Enterprise Is The Best Medicine For Global Health Challenges

Innovative business approaches, like social enterprise and public-private partnerships, hold the key to solving some of the trickiest global health challenges. Business often gets a bad rap -- especially in the area of high-profit pharmaceuticals. But if there's one thing we've seen time and again, it's that business models can offer the most effective and sustainable solution to global social challenges.
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Refugee Child Labourers Are A Growing Side Effect Of Syria's War

Of all the developments we have read about in the Syrian tragedy, the rising tide of child labour is one of the more concerning. We've worked on the issue of child labour for two decades, interviewing hundreds of too-young workers and learning about the long-term challenges they will face without an education. These kids want to help ease the burden poverty for their families now, but it will cost the Syrian people even more in poverty in the years to come. If there are no income opportunities for refugee families, we won't break the cycle of child labour.
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The Truth About Toxic Stress And Healthy Brains

Our culture has developed a powerful myth about why we succeed or fail in life. Disproving what most believe, numerous neuroscience studies out of institutions like Harvard University's Centre for the Developing Child show that strong, resilient brains are not born, they're built. The environment around us and every experience influences brain growth and our ability to cope with stress as adults. That which does not kill us, can damage us for life. It's time to put away the old myths of resiliency and character and learn what it really takes to build a healthy brain.