Google Glass

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How Soon Before We're Dependent on Google Glass?

For those consumers already feeling overwhelmed and distracted by the constant notifications which come with a smartphone, Google Glass is probably not the best choice. We have arguably developed a dependence towards smartphones. Before consumers become dependent on Glass, they should seriously consider the implications before making their decision. In a society where relying on the mind for information and computation becomes less important due to the proliferation of mobile computers that can do the work for us, Glass may further exacerbate the dependence on technology to access information.
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Will Google Glass Blind Us To Reality?

Instead of making Google Glass (and whatever other devices the wearable tech trend produces) more inclusive (read: affordable), companies are creating add-ons to make life more convenient for a wealthy demographic. But sometimes inconveniences are there for a reason: They remind us of the problems that need fixing.
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How Honest Is Your Online Persona?

Last week, the popular online dating site, Plenty of Fish, announced new features to try to weed out fake profiles. Whether you're for or against the gesture, it's difficult to think of the update as anything but that. We have become a society immersed in mass habitual tinkering in the gap between who we are and who we present ourselves to be, always at work on our personal "brand."
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Google Glasses make Humans One Step Closer to Cyborgs

The boundary between human and machine is softening. The first cyborgs have emerged -- much sooner than scientists would have predicted 30 years ago. We used to think having a device implanted in your skull made you a cyborg and wearing a pair of digital glasses did not. But to the brain, the distinction is arbitrary. Soon we may really have to answer the question: where does "me" end, and "my machine" begin?