Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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How Eco-Minded Airports Are Keeping Up With Global Travel

The world of global travel is changing. It's becoming more accessible and affordable; some might even say it's a necessity. Experts predict that air travel will double by the mid-2030s. It's boosting our economies, creating access to opportunities in local, national and international markets, and fueling adventure like never before. But it's also impacting our planet.
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It's Time For Trudeau To Lead Canada Into Climate Action

From Canada's early entry as a climate action leader -- hosting the world's first international scientific climate conference in 1988 -- until today, most governments have played for time. Stalling tactics and procrastination, two steps forward and one step back, have typified climate strategies. For the Trudeau administration, the clock is ticking loudly. Canada has still not replaced the weak target of the previous government. The Liberal platform promised a national plan, based on provincial consultations, within 90 days of the Paris talks, which is March 12.
David Dodge, GreenEnergyFutures.ca

Can This Radically Sustainable Home Survive A Cold, Canadian Winter?

An earthship is an off-grid home that produces its own energy, captures its own water, treats its own wastewater, grows its own food and passively collects the sun's energy for heat. That's the idea, anyways. But ever since the Kinney Earthship was built in the summer of 2014, Duncan Kinney has received many emails about one particular subject: how does it hold up so far north?
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Energy Storage Gives Renewables A Jump-Start

Renewable energy with storage has a number of advantages over fossil fuels. It can discharge power to the grid to meet demand more quickly and efficiently, and it's less prone to disruption, because power sources are distributed over a large area, so if one part is knocked out by a storm, for example, other parts keep the system running.
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Trade Restrictions Can Give The Paris Agreement Some Teeth

Much attention is paid to the fact that, like its predecessors, the Paris Agreement is "toothless" because it isn't backed up by an enforcement mechanism. This pessimism is understandable. Without clear and binding targets, how can any of the signatories be assured that their sacrifices will lead to meaningful emissions reductions? How can they know that the potentially difficult transition towards renewable energy will be a shared burden? The bad news is that the Paris Agreement is unlikely to introduce strict targets or develop an enforcement mechanism in the foreseeable future.