HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

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Solving Canada's National Housing Crisis Begins At Home

According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 12.5 per cent of all Canadian households experience an affordability crisis every day. Let me be clear -- this crisis is not limited to the real estate markets in Toronto and Vancouver. It is endemic and disproportionally affects low income working families, seniors, Indigenous people and recent immigrants. This is a large segment of our population that continually struggles to pay for the necessities of life.

Welcome to Sukkahville

Sukkahville is a celebration of design as well as an observation of a religious holiday and harvest festival. A sukkah is the name of a temporary shelter constructed by observant Jews at this time of year. Part design competition, part fundraiser, the multi-faceted celebration will culminate in a Pop-up exhibit to which everyone is invited on Sunday September 30

A Home is More Than Just Shelter

A common misconception about Habitat is that our homes are a handout, but what we actually provide is affordable homeownership, with low-income partner families repaying the full market value of their home over time. Last year, the lives of 227 families struggling to break the cycle of poverty began to be transformed as they moved into Habitat homes built in communities across Canada. Homeownership can change lives.
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Sukkahville has Designs on Affordable Housing

In Toronto, many thousands live in substandard housing, including 20,000 members of the Jewish community. As a local non-profit housing provider, Kehilla Residential Programme is acutely aware of the situation and has been striving to chip away at it since the organization's founding in 1982. Sukkahville 2012 is an innovative event organized by Kehilla, aimed at highlighting and combating the housing issues faced by so many members of the Toronto community.