Canada History

Would Politicians Make Good Goalkeepers?

Yanick Labrie | Posted 07.11.2014 | Canada Politics
Yanick Labrie

In a penalty kick situation, goalkeepers must decide what to do before clearly observing kick direction. Basically, goalkeepers feel worse, and are judged more harshly, if they stay in the centre and fail to stop the ball than if they jump left or right and fail. Another profession that exhibits action bias, and for much the same reason, is politics.

Will the 'Culturally Compatible' Immigrant Please Stand Up?

The Nudge Report | Posted 07.08.2014 | Canada Politics
The Nudge Report

PM Harper, Kenney and his crew have been careful not speak publicly on immigration matters. But Kenney slipped up while unrolling the red carpet for the Irish, not long after he cancelled 300,000 patiently-waiting skilled workers' applications. "The employers in Canada are increasingly identifying Ireland as a great source of talent, hard-working, highly-educated folks who are culturally compatible," Kenney said.

Noor Inayat Khan: The Muslim Spy Who Fought The Third Reich

Hina P. Ansari | Posted 06.11.2014 | Canada
Hina P. Ansari

With our media landscape filled with historical wartime accounts of various heroes and heroines and their respective call of duties, I honestly though...

Saving Mr. Mowat: An Art History Mystery

Hon. David C. Onley | Posted 06.03.2014 | Canada
Hon. David C. Onley

When the opportunity arose to play one of my predecessors in my favourite TV drama, I seized the moment. In the The Ghost of Queen's Park episode of t...

What Your Last Name Can Tell You About Your Ancestors

Lesley Anderson | Posted 06.01.2014 | Canada Living
Lesley Anderson

Have you ever thought about your last name and where it might have come from? It's hard for us today to believe that there was a time, not that long ago, when many people didn't have a last name. So, where did last names come from, and were they assigned or randomly selected? In fact, there are a number of ways your ancestors might have first acquired the surname you currently use.

An International Women's Day Alphabet

Anne Theriault | Posted 05.12.2014 | Canada
Anne Theriault

A is for Austen, the Regency hellion B is for Boudica, who raised a rebellion C is Cleopatra, fierce Queen of the Nile D is Diana, whose voice does...

Black History Month Deepens Racism's Roots

Reid Price | Posted 05.05.2014 | Canada
Reid Price

Now that Black History Month is over (didn't take long) I feel more comfortable in saying that I very much dislike it. Black people are more than a month, and are more than several prominent black figures. Black history should be a regular part of educational curriculum and media programming, yet it is differentiated and set aside, just as black people were not so long ago. How is this good?

When a Maid Murdered Her Master

Charlotte Gray | Posted 04.29.2014 | Canada Living
Charlotte Gray

Carrie behaved as if in a stupor, oblivious to the furor outside in the street. When she heard a policeman's voice, she thrust her hands into the arms of a shabby brown cloth coat and picked up the gun again. This time, she held it by the muzzle. Then she started downstairs.

If You Can't Warm Your Toes This February, Warm Your Heart

Lesley Anderson | Posted 04.24.2014 | Canada Living
Lesley Anderson

If you're looking for a way to beat the winter blues, take a look at the circumstances that surrounded the marriages of your ancestors and discover what kind of lives they lived with their spouses. You could find a love story that warms your heart, if not your toes, this winter. Here are some helpful tips to get you started.

How the Discovery of Insulin Helped My Family

University of Toronto News | Posted 04.15.2014 | Canada
University of Toronto News

Type 1 diabetes was once lethal but thanks to the Nobel prize-winning research conducted at the University of Toronto in 1921-22, had become a controllable condition through daily injections of insulin derived from cattle and pigs. My father's story reminds me about the importance of universities as places that create the space for big "what if" and "I wonder" questions.

The Racist Truth About Canadian Immigration

Rachel Décoste | Posted 04.09.2014 | Canada
Rachel Décoste

As many have noticed, the hoopla over Quebec's Values Charter is linked to immigration, and our reading of the tumult can be influenced by our knowledge of Canadian history, or lack thereof. Many immigrants do not espouse the revisionist recollections Canadians have.

Five Things You Might Not Know About American Thanksgiving

Ward Anderson | Posted 01.26.2014 | Canada Living
Ward Anderson

Turkey Day is upon us, and millions of Americans will be getting together with family and friends for food, football, and fun. Lots of food, actually. The average American will ingest an estimated 4,500 calories on that one day. Here are more facts about (American) Thanksgiving. Or as we call it in Canada: Thursday.

Political Correctness: Too Much and Not Enough

Rondi Adamson | Posted 11.06.2013 | Canada Living
Rondi Adamson

She explains what the "Shoah", or Holocaust was. She states that the reason she is being so slow and re-explaining basics to a room full of adults is that there are a lot of 'Orientali', or Asians, in our class, and they don't know about this period of history, especially the Chinese. She says this several times. I can hardly believe what I'm hearing.

Hermits Are Fashionable Again -- And They Aren't All Solitary

Tamara Griffiths | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada
Tamara Griffiths

Hermits are apparently becoming fashionable again. A study by I. Turina at the University of Bologna shows that the number of hermits in Europe is gro...

Where Are All the Women Time Travellers?

Lee Tunstall | Posted 01.23.2014 | Canada TV
Lee Tunstall

Women have been decidedly ignored when it comes to time travelling. As I was thinking about this I came across Anna Smith's recent article on this very topic in The Guardian. Time travelling women are indeed rare, especially in sci-fi film. Smith notes in particular that Rachel McAdams has had three roles in time travelling movies, only to remain firmly rooted in the her own timeline in each one.

David Gilmour's Real Victims Are His Students

Julie Mannell | Posted 11.27.2013 | Canada Living
Julie Mannell

If David Gilmour is indeed refusing to teach literature by women, queer, Chinese, and Canadian authors, then he is actively excluding them from the history that he imparts to his students. My fear for the future is that students are being denied the opportunity to learn from, be inspired by, and empathize with literature that doesn't fall under the white-hetero-male domain.

Johan Thoms: The Man Responsible for More Deaths Than Hitler and Stalin Combined

Vac Verikaitis | Posted 11.24.2013 | Canada
Vac Verikaitis

On June 28th, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire and head of one of the most powerful families in Europe at the time, is on a visit to Sarajevo in Bosnia, one of the provinces of the empire. The aforementioned title character of the novel, Johan Thoms, is assigned the task of being Franz Ferdinand's chaffeur during his visit. He fails, and indirectly causes World War One.

Scenes From ColombiaModa 2013 [PHOTOS]

Ramp1885.com | Posted 10.29.2013 | Canada Style
Ramp1885.com

The ColombaModa 2013 (Colombia Fashion Week) official opening fashion show was that of Colombian designer Francesca Miranda who presented her Fall/Winter 2013 show with an ethereal ambience.

Making Paper Cranes for Hiroshima

Anne Theriault | Posted 10.06.2013 | Canada
Anne Theriault

It's my birthday. It's also the 68th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, a fact that gives this day a complicated patina of heartache, remembrance and a funny thankfulness that, in spite if everything, this dear old planet and I have managed to complete yet another whirl around the sun.

Ridgeway: Canada's First Modern Military Battle

Tom Kott | Posted 09.02.2013 | Canada
Tom Kott

On June 1st 1866, a determined group of Civil War veterans boarded barges from Buffalo, crossed the Niagara River, and invaded Canada. The battle was small, as it lasted two days, and only saw 15 battleground deaths. It was plagued by inexperience, misunderstandings, screw ups, and failure on the Canadians' parts. But it shaped our nation.

Canadians Are Too Insecure to Be Proud

Rikia Saddy | Posted 08.28.2013 | Canada
Rikia Saddy

To be Canadian is to always feel just a little different than the cool kids. How can we compete when every one of us is an immigrant, or descendant of immigrants, and the mix of who we are changes constantly? Maybe we're asking the wrong question. If we took a closer look, we might find that we're cooler than we realize. Canadians have a unique relationship with our history. We're proud of the country we built, but ashamed of the steps we took to get here. For many of us, the easiest solution is to try not to look back at all. But when we don't know our history, we don't just miss out on a dusty old past. It makes it hard to imagine our future.

Seven Reasons to Visit Calgary After the Flood

Adrian Brijbassi | Posted 08.23.2013 | Canada Travel
Adrian Brijbassi

As we observe the historic flood and the damage it has done to this marvellous city and its neighbours, I wanted to list the great many things to celebrate about Calgary and southern Alberta. It's a reminder of why you should visit, once the water has receded and the restoration has begun.

Wrestling With The Komagata Maru

Naveen Girn | Posted 07.23.2013 | Canada British Columbia
Naveen Girn

The Komagata Maru was introduced to me sandwiched between narratives of the Chinese Head Tax and Japanese Internment. It had no scope to breathe. No room for discussion and further explanation. And it was the only time I remember seeing people that looked like me in my school textbooks. But the Komagata Maru is more elusive. It took me years to unlearn the biases I had built up around the story, hear the voices of the pioneers and understand the history on its own terms.

When Hockey Icon Crossed Paths With Vancouver Immigrant History

Naveen Girn | Posted 05.23.2013 | Canada British Columbia
Naveen Girn

Pressured by his in-laws to find a respectable occupation, Vancouver Millionaire's star player Fred "Cyclone" Taylor had a summer job that connected him with one of the most iconic historical moments in Canadian history -- the arrival of the Komagata Maru.

The Women Who Paved the Way for Abortions

Lindsay Pyfer | Posted 05.08.2013 | Canada Living
Lindsay Pyfer

This Women's Day I'm honoring a wise friend and foremother, Cecilie Scott. In mid-December, she called me to her bedside. In a hoarse voice, Cecilie recounted a story she hoped to write before she died about the lengths to which women were forced to go to end their pregnancies before Roe v. Wade became the law of the land in 1973.