INTERNET FREEDOM

The Internet Loves Stupid But You Should Be Smart

Because, I don't know about you, but I'm starting to really get tired of living in a world that facilitates and celebrates the culture of crass and the glorification of stupid. And make no mistake about it. While stupid is everywhere, nowhere is it more pronounced than on the web these days. Mainly because it's easy, it's free, it's everywhere, and it's the fastest route to notoriety and fame. There's good stuff out there. Stuff that both manages to communicate something good and entertain at the same time. One doesn't cancel out the other. It's not an either/or proposition. We just need to sift through the flotsam rising all too often on the top of the information cesspool to get to it.
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The Lesser-Known Elections That Truly Shape Canada's Freedom

Every year, CIRA holds elections and, just like electing a politician to represent your views about how the country should be run, you can elect the CIRA board to represent your views about how the country's Internet should be run. These elections are important. CIRA has considerable resources that could be put more forcefully towards ensuring Canadians have open and affordable options for Internet access. This year four places on CIRA's board are up for election.
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Don't Criminalize Our Internet Use

Legal experts are calling it "the biggest global threat to the internet." It's called the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and it will essentially criminalize free use of any website that uses copyrighted material. YouTube, Facebook, blogs with links -- all of it potentially blacklisted under this new order.

The Internet Treaty Canada Won't Sign

The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) negotiations wrapped up last week, bringing a whirlwind week to a close. This shift towards explicitly recognizing the authority of the ITU over Internet content led Canada, among many nations, to refuse to sign the final draft of the treaty.
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The People Putting Internet Freedom at Risk

As the International Telecommunication Union's negotiations move closer, more worrying developments are coming to light. At Openmedia we recently posted about some of the main concerns raised by the secretive negotiations, which threaten to change the Internet as we know it. A recent report highlights concerns that the proposals are particularly harmful to the developing world because accessing Internet content will become more expensive. Some content providers might choose to simply stop servicing regions with customers that have limited buying power. It's the role users play in Internet governance, not governments and big telecom conglomerates, that should be expanded.