Interprovincial Trade

Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press

Canada Already Has An Interprovincial Trade Agreement: Our Constitution

Even before Canada's Premiers departed Whitehorse on Friday, media coverage was applauding a "ground-breaking" and "historic" agreement on internal trade within Canada. Not so fast. One key omission was immediately evident. When it comes to alcohol, the agreement will establish "a working group on alcoholic beverages, which will explore opportunities to improve trade in beer, wine and spirits across Canada."

The Government's Approach to Trade Barriers Could Be Dangerous

Canada's premiers are in Charlottetown for their annual Council of the Federation meeting and once again the apparently catastrophic issue of interprovincial trade barriers ranks high on the agenda. Most premiers would rather talk about a real problem, like lack of infrastructure money, but western provinces and the federal government see their moment to change the conversation for reasons no one is being honest about. According to their line of thinking, which is fuelled by letters from a list of business lobby groups, interprovincial trade is hampered by barriers too numerous to count.

Our Nation's Businesses Suffer From Canadian Disease

In competitiveness, Canada did not even make this year's World Economic Form list of the 10 most competitive nations in the world. The problem is that Canada is badly managed politically. In fact politicians run the show and have balkanised the economy to suit their political agendas.