Invasive Species

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How To Keep Your Garden Canadian

Many of the plants we have in our yards are not native to Canada. In some cases, these non-native plants are invasive and can intrude into nearby natural areas or affect the growth and spread of native species. In most cases, native plants provide better habitat for birds and pollinators than non-native plants. Honey bees depend on native plants in order to produce honey and survive while doing their part to spread these native species.

Asian Carp Found Near Lake Ontario

Without question, the Asian carp poses a significant threat to the health of the Great Lakes watershed. This highlights the importance of effective invasive species prevention programs and bi-national collaboration to ensure that the Asian carp and other non-native species don't make their way into these waters.
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How One Little Mussel Changed the Great Lakes Forever

The rainbow was once widely distributed and common in many rivers and creeks in southern Ontario. Today it is extremely rare. While we did our part in obliterating the rainbow by polluting its river home, today, the number one threat to this species is invasive, non-native zebra mussels.

Bill C-38: The Law That Will Break Nature's Back?

Canada's environmental laws are under attack by both the federal and Ontario governments. In Ottawa, the government introduced Bill C-38 to implement far-reaching measures announced in its budget. The 420-page Bill C-38 will gut a raft of federal laws passed over the years to ensure that our air, water, and most vulnerable wildlife populations are protected.