JOURNALISTS

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Watching the Watchdog: Why Journalists Do What We Do

We journalists have done a lousy job of explaining how we do our jobs, how we practice our craft, to the people we serve. I'm of the opinion that our low ranking in public opinion polls is because we don't even try to tell the people who we are, what we believe in, what we do and why we do it. So allow me to try.
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The Travel Writer's Dilemma

Several large media organizations won't publish articles if a travel writer received assistance from a tourism board, or they will put a disclosure at the end of the article saying the trip was sponsored. This is a blatant double standard, and it stands to hurt and limit the importance of travel journalism.
AP File

Does "Objectivity" Belong in Newscasts About Climate Change?

Although climate change seems to be insidiously disrupting our social fabric, it makes the newscast only when there's a dramatic natural disaster. But given the strong consensus between the media and environmental advocates that objectivity doesn't do justice for climate change how can the news media provide effective coverage of climate change?
Flickr: espensorvik

Watching the Watchdog: Don't Mess With Mesley

You wouldn't ever want to answer your front door to find Wendy Mesley holding a microphone there -- right next to a CBC camera flashing its little red light. Last Sunday, some of the old pre-perky Mesley came back. The following is the last part of of Mesley's interview with Jacques Duchesneau, the former Montreal police chief.
AP

Watching the Watchdog: Last Night Obama Got His Mojo Back

During his first debate with Mitt Romney, Barack Obama seldom looked directly at Romney. He seldom contradicted Romney. He never raised his voice to Romney. He never really challenged Romney. So what happens in the second U.S. presidential debate? OBAMA GETS HIS MOJO BACK!!! He came out bristling for a fight. This time Obama's in charge. He dominates the fight, provides the drive, the passion. This time, no deference.
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Watching the Watchdog: Ode to a New York Times Legend

Most newspaper journalists aren't overly-fond of their publishers. Arthur "Punch" Sulzberger who was publisher of the estimable New York Times was always a splendid exception. In fact, he put his own freedom, and his newspaper's very existence, on the line because he believed absolutely in the public's right to know. Punch Sulzberger died Saturday and got a send-off few publishers anywhere have ever earned.

Watching the Watchdog: Journalism's Complicit Role in Sexual Abuse

Last Sunday came yet another T.V. documentary detailing alleged abuse of young boys by Roman Catholic priests. As a journalist I investigated all sorts of stories about abuse of power. But, to my shame, it never occurred to me to investigate those rumours I'd heard so many years before about sexual abuse and the Catholic church in Newfoundland and Labrador.