Livestrong

Behind the Headlines: Should Armstrong's Charity Suffer For His Sins?

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 03.18.2013 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

The trouble with Lance Armstrong's fall from grace is that he wasn't just a sports hero; he was a self-styled symbol of hope. Which is why we're all left wondering: does his doping confession negate his charitable work? Candidly, we're conflicted. Some of the onus for Armstrong's fall lies on our cultural tendency to elevate celebrities and sports idols to too-good-to-be-true status, then crucify them in the court of public opinion at their every transgression.

Armstrong Admits To Doping: Report

CP | Posted 03.16.2013 | Canada

AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong confessed to Oprah Winfrey during an interview Monday that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de Fr...

Rebrand -- What's a Lovemark, Anyway?

Kerry Harris | Posted 12.23.2012 | Canada Business
Kerry Harris

What is a "lovemark" you ask? Well, I like to say that it's all about the emotional cement. Brands that are emotionally cemented to their customers reach their hearts as well as their minds and they deliver beyond expectations of great functional performance. They capture "heartshare as well as mindshare." It really has been a bad year for lovemarks (ahem, RIM).

STRIPPED OF TITLES

CP | Graham Dunbar, The Associated Press | Posted 12.22.2012 | Canada

GENEVA - Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life by cycling's governing body Monday following a report fro...

Lance Armstrong Steps Down as Livestrong Chairman

Ryan Doyle | Posted 12.17.2012 | Canada
Ryan Doyle

A week after the United States Anti-Doping Agency showed the world its evidence in the doping case against Armstrong, claiming he was at the centre of an organized doping program on his Tour de France winning teams, Armstrong stepped down on Wednesday as chairman of Livestrong, his cancer foundation. Nike, the company that had his back for over ten year's worth of doping allegations, was quick behind. They decided to unceremoniously terminate his contract. Neither of these decisions will keep me up at night, in fact they should have been done weeks ago. However! what is sorely lacking from all of Wednesday's announcements are two words that should leave Armstrong's lips and echo around the cycling stratosphere.

The USADA Must be High if They Think Armstrong is on Drugs

Peter Worthington | Posted 08.18.2012 | Canada
Peter Worthington

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency is seeking to strip Lance Armstrong of his cycling awards, and ban him from triathlon competitions on the grounds that the world's greatest cyclist has been taking performance-enhancing drugs. Only problem is they don't have a single shred of proof, and Armstrong has been tested 500 times. So on what basis can they possibly accuse him of cheating?