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Diversity Begets Diversity In Film And Television

The point is: when people resist more open casting, in a lot of cases they don't really think they have any particular prejudice. They are acting upon a vague feeling. It feels "right" to them to have a white man as the hero because those are the heroes they grew up with, that inspired them to then create their own stories. It feels "normal." Until someone comes along, challenges that norm -- and they realize, 'Hey, this works, too!'
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The Death and Return of Captain Canuck

Captain Canuck was the first Canadian super hero since the 1940s. And he's the Grand Old Man compared to later characters like Northguard or the American-published Vindicator/Guardian (or whatever he/she's called these days) of Alpha Flight. And this Canada Day, he returns in his very own web series.
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Courage and Cowardice in Canadian TV

At heart, every story has probably been told, so it's in the details it's kept fresh. When Canadian filmmakers refuse to set their productions in Canada, they are basically announcing: "We have no intention of doing anything fresh with this material." If the creators aren't willing to fight for something as rudimentary as the setting, can we really expect them to fight for other things? Is the fact that so many of these filmmakers are unwilling to set their stories explicitly in Canada part of the reason why there are so few Canadian series and movies fronted by non-white actors? 'Cause that might be a fight with executives, too.