Media

ASSOCIATED PRESS

How Did Journalists Fail To Diagnose A Trump Win?

The first common bias that affects journalists is availability bias: the tendency to judge the likelihood of an outcome (a disease or an election) based on what most easily comes to mind. So, for instance, Obama's historical win over the last two elections might be fresh in a young journalist's mind. So too can the diagnosis of asthma in a child -- if the physician previously saw eight cases of the same.
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The Raging Inferno Of Online Comments

Times of tragic loss understandably affect large amounts of people and it is dangerous to trivialize their losses by making sweeping and grandiose "gotcha" statements, as though the fires in Fort McMurray are the linchpin for or against climate change, the present government, or whichever other dots may find themselves ripe for loose connection.
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The Blurred Line Between Advertorial And Editorial

There used be a great divide between the advertising and editorial departments of media outlets; they operated in separate silos and never the twain shall meet. But those days are gone. At the end of the day, the media is a business -- and it's a tough business. Revenues are drying up, falling year after year. It makes good business sense to leverage earned media opportunities with a paid advertising buy.
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The Media Isn't To Blame For The Ruthlessness Of Eating Disorders

Eating disorders don't care if you're male or female, under 10 years old or over 50 years old. They'll destroy anyone who's ripe for the picking. When I speak at school or to parents about body image, the issue of media manipulation always comes up and for good reason. We are definitely influenced by what we see and hear in our magazines and TV screens, but does the media CAUSE eating disorders? I say no.
CP

CBC Is Threatening Its Future By Mixing Journalism And Opinion

These comments, these opinions, by CBC journalists unequivocally violate CBC's long-standing, public and incredibly clearly-written policy statement that its journalists and the organization itself must not take any positions on issues in the public life of the country. CBC's senior news managers need to get serious about this.