Muslim Brotherhood

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Is Egypt's True Enemy Paranoia?

During the short-lived rule of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood complained bitterly about the "deep state" while liberal-secularists accused the Brotherhood of consolidating power throughout Egypt to push through its conservative social policies. In rebutting these claims, each side accused the other of sheer paranoia.
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In Egypt, Only the Dead Know Who is Right

What stance do I take on Egypt? I can defend the killings and support the military, but my voice will change nothing on the ground. On the other hand, I can condemn the killings, guessing but not knowing, that of the 900 or more estimated dead so far, most were not armed, not terrorists, some not even Morsi supporters.
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Canadians Held In Egypt

A pair of Canadians detained in Egypt, where nearly 1,000 people have been killed in clashes between police and supporters of ousted president Mohammed Morsi, will get a second visit today from Canadi...
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They Burned the Churches and With Them, My Childhood

Wednesday, a few minutes after the Egyptian police attacked the Muslim Brotherhood sit-ins in Cairo, Islamists started targeting Christians (Copts) and churches in allover the country. Over 25 churches were burned down, and lots of shops and private property of Christians were robbed and destroyed. Among the burned ones was the Adventist Chapel in Assiut, the place where I attended kindergarten for around two years. My fear is that Egypt's Christians are going to face the same destiny as its Jews. Now, as Egypt may face a civil war after the July 3 coup, massacres against Christians will happen more,
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Egyptian Army Kills Dozens

CAIRO - Egyptian security forces killed more than 50 supporters of Egypt's ousted president in one of the deadliest single episodes of violence in more than 2 1/2 years of turmoil. The toppled leader'...

Reversal of Fortune in Egypt: How the Muslim Brotherhood Fumbled

There has been a lot of debate about the nature of Egypt's changing political landscape in the past few days -- did a coup remove President Mohamed Morsi or was the military acting on behalf of a massive popular uprising? But one thing almost everyone agrees on is how quickly the 85-year-old Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi lost favour with the people.
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The Egyptian Coup Is Nothing to Celebrate

The grassroots Egyptian movement that marshalled millions into Tahrir Square will call this great amassment of people power a revolution. But when the dust settles and the euphoria of another night at Tahrir dissipates, I'm afraid people will wake up to the realization that they are effectively under a military regime.