NEW POPE

AP

Stop Coddling the Catholic Church

I have no quarrel with individual members of the Catholic Church and I am personally a man of faith. But I do have a quarrel with the Vatican -- and the toady, obsequious manner in which the media has been reporting on the appointment of the new "his holiness."
AP

10 Facts About The New Pope

Here are some facts about the new Pope (text version below slideshow): %Slideshow-546593% - Jorge Mario Bergoglio was born Dec. 17, 1936, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, one of five children born to an I...
AP

HOLY SMOKE! New Pope Chosen

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, who will be known as Pope Francis, has been elected to lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics. He is the first Pope from the Americas and the first from o...
AP

WATCH: Pope Francis Greets The World

Catholics all over the world watched the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday with anticipation as it was finally announced: "Habemus Papum" — "We have a pope!" Pope Francis, formerly Cardina...
Getty Images

New Pope Revealed To World

The Roman Catholic Church has a new pope, and the man chosen to lead the world's 1.2 billion Catholics has a new name: Francis. The new pope, formerly Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, was...
AP/Getty Images

The 10 Most Popular Papal Names

As the world waits for the name of the new pope, predictions are flying about what moniker the next pontiff will adopt. The leaders of the early church kept their birth names, but starting in 533 AD m...
Getty Images

How Long Will Conclave Take?

The retirement of Benedict XVI on Feb. 28 marks the first time in nearly 600 years that a pope has decided to step down, which forces the Roman Catholic Church to begin the ancient election process kn...
Getty

Let's Talk About Catholic Church Reform

Currently the Church is seeing its membership stagnate and decline in the west. The developing world, however, stands in sharp contrast. The number of Catholics is increasing rapidly in Africa, Asia and South America. Suggestions that the Church needs to reform to survive are clearly North American-centric. What Catholicism needs now is for ordinary church members to play a part in reform.