Norman Bethune

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Ten Bio-Pics for Canada Day

Great movies have been made about lesser figures and lesser movies have been made about great figures. With a nod to Canada Day, here's a look at (more-or-less) 10 movies that might warrant a trip to the DVD store...
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Dr. Norman Bethune: China's Hero, Canada's Traitor

Virtually unknown in Canada, and certainly unheralded, Dr. Norman Bethune was magnified and glorified by Mao and Chinese communists who declared him a national hero. Bethune was not in China to help humanity. It was not sick people he tended, but wounded communist soldiers. So Canadians became conditioned to the idea that by publicly revering Bethune, it gave them an advantage with the Chinese. The irony is that were Bethune alive, he'd be outraged and horrified at how he is manipulated.

The Week That Was: MAJOR BREAKING NEWS...

...not. Got your attention though didn't I? The old saying "No news is good news" was never said by a journalist. No news = no customers. We feel like bored salespeople, constantly re-arranging the goods in the front window. This isn't to say we wish ill or disaster upon the world (not openly anyway). But is it wrong to wish for more than, say, the Tony Clement/Ezra Levant/Norman Bethune controversy?
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The Conservatives' Love Affair With Communists

Canada's intellectual and political elite have a dilemma: how do they deal with Dr. Norman Bethune's legacy? On the one hand they desperately want to praise Bethune for his so-called "humanitarian" and innovative efforts as a surgeon, but on the other hand there's that nasty little historical fact concerning the good doctor's sordid political beliefs, i.e. he had a crush on Joseph Stalin.