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Small Businesses Across Canada Are Standing up Against Bill C-51

Small businesses across Canada are speaking up to warn the government about the economic damage that its "secret police" Bill C-51 will inflict on our economy. If Bill C-51 is passed, it will change Canada's economic climate for the worse, notably by harming Canadian commerce, trade, and data security. This upsurge in opposition from small businesses couldn't be more timely: committee hearings on the Bill are continuing today in the Senate, while the House of Commons could hold its final vote in just days.
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Harper Is Willing and Able to Keep Canada Under Surveillance

Yes, there have always been spies and espionage, all with the aim of stopping some calamity, the existential threats. But thanks to Snowden, the computer geek with the highest levels of clearance, we now know the U.S. has turned its giant spying apparatus on its own people. We also know, thanks to Snowden, that the Harper government is a willing participant and keen to add to our rapidly ballooning surveillance state. And future consequences may be dire.
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Big Brother Is Listening And It's Time To Get Mad

What if Edward Snowden was Canadian? Would his sacrifice have been for naught? The government is spying on Canadians without warrants and nobody seems to care. As a child, I was taught that a democracy cannot invade the privacy of its citizens without consulting a court. As an adult, I fear we are no longer living in a democracy. But Canadians are not powerless. It's time to get angry.
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Why State Surveillance Isn't Going Away Anytime Soon

The current state of government surveillance, the massive intrusion into our privacy, is not going to change anytime soon. A chance to move the debate constructively forward was missed. State surveillance, the collection of metadata, and some type of infringement of our right to privacy is going to continue. The only questions are to what extent and under what circumstances -- the law's never-ending search for proportionality. That is the debate that needs to be had, urgently.
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NSA REFORM

WASHINGTON - The White House wants the National Security Agency to get out of the business of sweeping up and storing vast amounts of data on Americans' phone calls. And a proposal to have the governm...

Why Dissent is Important

You're a prisoner in your own home. Not able to fall asleep from the gunfire down the street, you fear that your house is next. You protested a new law that gave even more power to a despotic government. One of your friends was murdered, another was raped. This is a fear that has not played out in the western world. We have security, peace, and far more freedom than others.
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Co-Worker Helped Him Out

WASHINGTON - A National Security Agency employee resigned from the agency after admitting to federal investigators that he gave former NSA analyst Edward Snowden a digital key that allowed him to gain...
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How NSA Leaks Spooked Canadian Spies

OTTAWA - The massive intelligence leak by former U.S. spy contractor Edward Snowden prompted Canada's secret eavesdropping agency to review its policies on sharing information with the Americans and o...
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Media Bites: All the Many "Valuable" Lessons We Learned in 2013

The Canadian press has been offering no shortage of year-in-review columns as of late. What's my pick for top story of 2013, you ask? I don't know if I have a headline per se, but I do have a theme: the decline of Brand Canada. If there's one thing Justin Trudeau, Rob Ford, and the Senate scandal have in common, after all, it's that they all prove, in different ways, that Canada is not nearly as serious, respectable, and mature of a country as we often like to believe.
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Freedom Of Thought Requires Privacy, Not State Scrutiny

Imagine that I took all the e-mails and messages that I have ever written, as well as recordings of all Skype calls that I have ever made, and gave them to a group of strangers. Should we trust the priorities these strangers will have in 10 years, or 20 or 50? Should we trust that this immense cache of data will not become a commodity, traded to other governments that exist now, or will exist in the future?