Off Grid Living

Off-Grid Living: Voluntary Simplicity or Involuntary Complexity?

To go to the woods to live deliberately. To face but the essential challenges of life. To learn from raw experience and self-taught skill. To live simply, in a Spartan-like manner, in order to suck all the marrow out of life. These are the reasons why Henry David Thoreau moved to a cabin near Walden Pond in rural Massachusetts in the mid-1800s. Many other seekers of a better way of life set out to do just the same today, all over Canada
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Living Off-Grid: The "Quiet Revolution"

At a time when jumpstarting a mob is as easy as creating a new Facebook group or signing the latest petition, any disinterest in political activism might seem just careless, apathetic, and even lazy. But the lack of an "off-gridders of the world" organization seems to me to speak to a completely different sense of involvement and an alternative way of doing politics. Our homes -- our grid-connected homes -- are intertwined to one another through extensive lines.

What It's Like Living off the Grid

Living off the grid means many things these days. Some say they're "off the grid" if they go camping and leave their mobile phone at home for a weekend. Others think being off the grid is living like hermits and runaways, stuck somewhere in between a bush and a hard place. As to why people do that, well, we're taking two years to find out.