Online Advertising

Dave Broberg via Getty Images

How to Get Your Business Noticed at the Superbowl

With a reported record cost of $4.5 million rate for a 30-second spot in the U.S. and up to $200,000 in Canada, many companies don't have the budget to get their brand into the big game. That doesn't mean businesses won't get creative and try to intercept the spotlight during the mecca of the advertising calendar. Companies can attempt a field goal with the following three points to get noticed.
shutterstock

How Brands Can Connect With Vacationing Customers

Summer in Canada is short. For four months of the year, the majority of Canadians are heading to patios, beaches and national parks -- anywhere they can soak in the sunshine and try to forget about the frigid winter that just passed. To truly win over consumers we need to provide timely value and relevance with every touch point.
Dimitri Otis via Getty Images

The Face of Advertising is Changing (Or Is It?)

In 2013, one of the most common refrains I heard while selling print ads to small business owners was "We are concentrating on our online advertising". There is no doubt there is, and should be, an upward trend towards owning your online footprint. However, the idea of marketing exclusively online for a brick and mortar business is unwise to say the least. Conversely, an online business should not close their minds to traditional advertising.
Getty

Twitter's IPO: Pay For it, But Don't Expect Equality

Twitter is the latest in a string of companies putting users at the whim of hasty policy changes and a rapid monetization policy put in place for IPO. You want to use it? Pay for it. While there's technically nothing wrong with this idea -- Twitter is a company and they should make money -- the fact that they're still alluding to the impression that all users have an equal opportunity in achieving influence is just inaccurate.
Getty

Baby, You Can Track My Online Activity

Before you start lighting up those pitchforks and come after us marketers with a mix of mass hysteria and moral panic, take a look at your own online behavior and ask yourself, which scenario you prefer? Go to Amazon and start shopping (presuming you have been there before), and ask yourself, "what is the experience like?"

The Pageview Industrial Complex

It's hard to argue that most content-based webpages aren't all that annoying, but there is a cost for access and there is a cost for this content that must be paid by the consumers. Whether this is a paid-subscription model to underwrite the profitability of the business or ad-supported as the model, consumers have to accept that advertising and pageviews are going nowhere.

Marketing Outside the "Dark Ages"

There's no shortage of thoughtful insights about how the Internet has revolutionized business practices across all industries. With those changes also comes a revolution in marketing. For some this i...

Sportsnet Sells its Soul for Windows 8

Explain to me, Sportsnet, why you have given away the home page of your website -- your URL and therefore your entire online identity -- as a bundle cog in some (hopefully for your soul) luxurious advertising package with Microsoft and Windows 8?
Alamy

What's Really Killing Print Journalism

Print journalism is changing fundamentally. Three dramatic events last week make the point: On October 18, Newsweek magazine announced it will become a digital only publication in 2013, ending 80 years in print. Newspapers have failed, so far, to acquire the skill sets required for print journalism in the 21st century.
AFP

How Online Forums Can Monetize and Grow

Some of the biggest retailers are beginning to realize that there are engaged communities that reside predominantly in forums and boards that provide amazing insight into product/service development, company sentiment. But brands still don't understand dynamics of online communities.

Online Advertisers Still Don't Have it Figured Out

Last week, comScore released a white paper titled "The Economics of Online Advertising," that looked at the state of online advertising. You may think that online advertising is the future, and that as media dollars shift to digital (because that's where the eyeballs are) that online will be able to better serve brands in terms of delivering higher relevancy with better metrics. It turns out, that after close to two decades since the first online ad was served, that our industry still has a ways to go.

Killer Guerilla With a Side of Bacon

Radio is not dead, it's alive, and in Toronto it's kicking. Toronto is the largest radio market in Canada. There are over 20 radio stations covering a population of six million-plus. The competition i...

Do Online Video Ads Need to Be a Necessary Evil?

As we all continue to spend more time online, across multiple devices and screens, watching online video has become a mainstay for most of us. Yet the content we love to watch is often accompanied by time-consuming video ads. What if there was a way for us to choose whether we wanted to view these ads that still allowed advertisers and publishers to get paid?
AFP/Getty Images

Be Glad You're the Target of Online Advertising

Later this year Canadians will see a change happening with online advertising: the introduction of a small icon on the ad that tells consumers they are being targeted and gives them the ability to opt-out. I embrace the move because most consumers have a general lack of understanding about targeted ads. This will help clear things up.
Shutterstock

When Facebook Goes Public, So Will Your Secrets

Facebook's profits are tied to a morally questionable business model; one that is addictive, and insidious for users. For all the good that Zuckerberg's company has done for reconnecting people, and letting them communicate with one another, Facebook exists to extract from those relationships the secrets of what makes us tick consumers.
AP

Behavioural Advertising: Who's Watching You?

How would you feel if mall security cameras didn't simply monitoring you for stealing, but instead kept tabs on the specific brands, styles, colours and sizes of clothes you tried on, the magazines you leafed through at newsstands, what you ordered from the food court, and everything you actually bought during your visit?