Ontario Budget

Kathleen Wynne

What Ontario's Balanced Budget Means For You

The budget we have tabled in the legislature is entirely about you. It's about your family, your hopes and your dreams. It's about the things that keep you up at night worrying. This budget is about making the choices that help you navigate the turbulence of a changing economy with greater security and more opportunity. And it's about setting your province on a course toward long-term success.
CP

Ontario's Hocus Pocus Budget

There's nothing magical about the ninth consecutive deficit, or the $296 billion in debt the province will have as of March 31. Nor in the nearly one billion per month in interest payments our government has us paying. But Wynne and Sousa's commitment that the budget will be balanced next year requires faith in the supernatural.
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Free Tuition For Low-Income Students Is An Investment In Our People And Ontario

Hearing directly from students about issues they care deeply about was a great experience. As a Premier whose top priority is to ensure everyone can get a good job, it's my job to fix these problems. It's my job to erase any worries people have that a college or university education is out of reach. And it's my job to make it easier for more young people to continue learning and pursuing their passions after high school. That's why, as announced in last week's Ontario 2016 Budget, we are making the single-largest modernization of student financial assistance in the history of our province.
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Climate Change Is Nature's Tax On Everything

I'm outraged. Like you, my cost of living is going up. Home insurance premiums are up due to extreme weather. Food prices are up due to extreme drought. Taxes are up to pay for infrastructure that's been destroyed by ice storms and flooding. This climate thing is starting to cost -- a lot. Nature's response to our pollution is like a tax on everything. Since carbon pollution keeps getting worse, nature is digging even deeper into my pocket. So, what is government going to do to put an end to this cash grab?
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Ontario Can Look to Greece to See the Dangers of an Underground Economy

The Greek failure to successfully address tax evasion should prove instructive to Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, who in 2014 pledged to crack down on tax cheats. Greek measures to tackle evasion with enforcement have resulted in only small improvements. An enforcement only strategy should not be the model Ontario follows for tackling the underground economy. Relying on enforcement and punishment squeezes legitimate businesses who are already faced with high compliance costs and tax and regulatory burdens.
CP

Canadian Governments Have Failed to Slay the Real Deficit We Face

Thanks to former Prime Minister Paul Martin, I think we've all been conditioned to think that balanced budgets are very good things. But not all deficits are bad. It is prudent or even smart to slash and scrap into a surplus like Stephen Harper has done. Especially considering that Canada's infrastructure deficit is estimated at nearly $400 billion -- and growing.
CP

Ontario Budget Date Revealed

TORONTO - There will be no "extreme measures" in the Ontario budget next week as the government moves to reduce a $10.9-billion deficit, although there will be changes to the way beer is sold, Finance...
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Ontario's Debt Situation Is About To Get a Whole Lot Worse

Consider that in 2013/14 interest on the provincial debt was $10.6 billion. According to the province's fall fiscal update, that was just over half of all provincial sales tax revenue paid by Ontarians last year ($20.5 billion). So Ontarians should know that when you pay your provincial sales tax at the till, half of it flutters away just to pay your provincial government's debt interest.
CP

Are "Wynne Days" Coming?

We've seen this script before. Higher spending. Tax increases. Persistent deficits. Growing debt. Warnings from credit rating agencies. A government unwilling to make the tough choices to turn things around. That's the Ontario of the 1980s and early 1990s. It's also where the province finds itself today.