Paris Agreement

People take part in a protest about climate change around New York City Hall at lower Manhattan, New York, November 29, 2015, a day before the start of the Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21). (Eduardo Munoz/Reuters)

There's Almost No Chance Of Meeting Paris Climate Goals, Warns Grim New Study

Two degrees Celsius: That's the global temperature increment scientists say the world must stay beneath to avoid the worst effects of climate change. But according to a study published this week in th...
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Climate Leaders Don't Build Pipelines

Back in 2011, Canada made history by being the first country to formally pull out of the Kyoto Protocol. It was a bold move, but yesterday, Justin Trudeau actually managed to one up the feat, albeit in different style. On Tuesday, he approved the Kinder Morgan and Line 3 tar sands pipelines making Canada the first country on the planet to, in effect, promise to break the commitments they made to under the Paris Climate Agreement.
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What Does British Columbia Have To Do With COP22?

Most people agree that there is a clear connection between tackling sustainable development and tackling climate change. We know that we will not solve climate change without addressing the key contributing issues of energy, food security, water, and poverty. We also know that the impacts of climate change could wipe away any progress toward achieving gains in those same areas. So how do we as British Columbians tackle all of these issues in a meaningful and timely way?
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We Can't Dig Our Way Out Of Our Fossil Fuels Problem

Most national governments have committed to the 2015 Paris Agreement's goal of limiting global warming to 2 C above pre-industrial levels, with an aspirational goal of 1.5 C. We're already nearing the latter, with growing consequences, including increasing extreme weather events, water and food shortages, migration crises and extinctions. We must conserve energy, quickly phase out coal power and continue to develop renewable resources.
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We Need To Move From Climate Commitment To Climate Action

We cannot spend tens of millions of dollars promoting a low carbon future while also spending tens of millions promoting extractives. With the Agreement in full force, Canada can pivot its approach to international assistance to reflect real policy coherence. We need to support small-scale, decentralized clean energy programs that promote pro-poor, gender sensitive projects.
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Airline Emissions Are Flying Too High

As promising as solar and electric planes may be, these technologies still have a way to go and won't likely usher in a new era of airline travel soon. That's unfortunate, because aircraft are major sources of pollution and climate-altering greenhouse gases, contributing the same amount of emissions as Germany, about two per cent of the global total. As air transport becomes increasingly popular, experts project aircraft emissions could triple by 2050.
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Making The Most Of Canada's Contribution To Climate Financing

We've heard where $575 million of the contribution will go, including to renewable energy in Africa, climate risk insurance and to the Least Developed Countries Fund. We haven't heard what percentage of the funds will go to adaptation efforts. This needs early clarification, and there need to be transparent discussions on the disbursement of the over $2 billion that is yet to be allocated.